close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Personal problems of high school senior girls

код для вставкиСкачать
PERSONAL PROBLEMS OF HIG-H SCHOOL
SENIOR GIRLS
A Thesis
Presented to
the Faculty of the School of Education
University of Southern California
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Science in Education
by
Erma Stevens
August 1941
UMI Number: EP54310
All rights reserved
INFORMATION TO ALL USERS
The quality of this reproduction is dependent upon the quality of the copy submitted.
In the unlikely event that the author did not send a complete manuscript
and there are missing pages, these will be noted. Also, if material had to be removed,
a note will indicate the deletion.
Dissertation Publ shsng
UMI EP54310
Published by ProQuest LLC (2014). Copyright in the Dissertation held by the Author.
Microform Edition © ProQuest LLC.
All rights reserved. This work is protected against
unauthorized copying under Title 17, United States Code
ProQuest LLC.
789 East Eisenhower Parkway
P.O. Box 1346
Ann Arbor, Ml 48106- 1346
This thesis, written under the direction of the
Chairman of the candidate’s Guidance Committee
and approved by a ll members of the Committee
has been presented to and accepted by the Faculty
of the School of Education in partial fu lfillm e n t
of the requirements fo r the degree of Master of
Science in Education.
,
D ate...
......
Guidance Committee
C. C. Crawford
C hairman
0. E. Hull
D. Welty Lefever
t a b u : of contents
CHAPTER
PAGE
I. THE PROBUM AND DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED........ 1 . 1
The problem* . . ......................... \
. . 1
Statement of the p r o b l e m ..................... . 1
Importance of the study......................... 2
Definitions of terms used......................... 5
Personal .....................................
5
Problem. .
.........................
5
Guidance
................................... 5
"Problemsire"...........................
....
5
Limitations of the s t u d y ......................... 6
Scope of the s t u d y ............................. 6
Weaknesses of the study.
................. 6
Organization of remainder of thesis............... 7
U . REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
................... 9
Investigative literature ........................ 9
Questionnaire studies.
...................... 9
Studies of problems brought to d e a n s .......... 19
Case studies..................................21
General literature
............................ 23
Adolescence.................................... 23
Psychology....................................25
M Mental h y g i e n e.........................
.26
ill
CHAPTER
PAGE
III. THE MATERIALS AMD TECHNIQUES OF THE STUDY . . . . . 29
The formulation of the "problemsire" and
methods used...................
30
The development of the "problemsirew. • . . • . 3 0
The method of procedure....................... 33
The groups studied............................. 34
Distribution and interpretation................. 35
Distribution................................... 35
Differentiation of g r o u p s ..................... 35
Interpretation of findings..................... 36
Comparison of results and m e t h o d s ........... . 3 7
IV. ANALYSIS OF THE RESULTS OF THE "PROBLSMAIRE"
S T U D Y .......................................... 39
Problems of school l i f e ........................ 41
Problems of
home life • • • • . . .............. 44
Problems of boy and girl relationships. . . . . .
48
Problems of vocation............................ 52
Problems concerning friends ........
56
Problems of religion............................ 60
Problems of health.
Problems of
.......................... 63
recreation.......................... 67
Problems concerning money ...................... 71
Problems concerning clothes .................... 74
iv
CHAPTER
PAGE
Miscellaneous problems.
.........
77
Additional problems ...........................
81
Areas of greatest number of problems. . . . . . .
83
The most serious problems.................... . 86
Outstanding problems......................... . 87
Problems not in tables........................... 89
Special comparisons .........................
*93
V. AN ANALYSIS OF GUIDANCE METHODS REPORTED BY
COUNSELORS.......................................96
Technique
...............
. . 96
Comparison of methods withinschools.............. 97
Comparison of methods with findings of
"problemaire"............................... .110
VI. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS.......................... 118
Summary.....................
.
118
Conclusions and recommendations............... .125
BIBLIOGRAPHY..........................................130
APPENDIX
.............
134
LIST OF TABLES
TABLE
PAGE
I* The
TenMost Common Problems of School Life. • • 42
II. The
TenMost Serious Problems of School Life . . 45
III. The
TenMost Common Problems of Home Life. . . . 45
IV. The
TenMost Serious Problems of Home Life . . . 46
V. The
TenMost Common Problems of Boy and Girl
Relationships.................................49
VI. The Ten Most Serious Problems of Boy and Girl
Relationships. • • • . . • • . • • • • • • • • 5 0
VII. The
TenMost Common Problems of Vocation . . . . 53
VIII. The
TenMost Serious Problems of Vocation. . . . 54
IX. The
TenMost Common Problems Concerning
Friends.......................................57
X. The Ten Most Serious Problems Concerning
Friends...................................... 58
XI.
TheTen Most Common Problems of Religion . . . .
61
XII.
TheTen Most Serious Problems of Religion. . . .
62
XIII.
TheTen Most Common Problems of Health . . . . .
64
XIV*
TheTen Most Serious Problems of Health......... 65
XV. The
TenMost Common Problems of Recreation . . . 68
XVI. The
TenMost Serious Problems of Recreation. . • 69
XVIX. The
TenMost Common Problems Concerning Money. • 72
XVIII. The
TenMost Serious Problems Concerning Money • 73
vi
TABLE
PAGE
XIX* The Ten Most Common Problems Concerning
Clothes* • • • ...........
* . •. ............. 75
XX* The Ten Most Serious Problems Concerning
<
Clothes*.; * ................................ 76
t
XXI* The Ten Most Common Miscellaneous Problems. . . .
XXII# The Ten Most Serious Miscellaneous Problems.
78
. . . 79
CHAPTER
I
THE PROBLEM AND DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED
The senior girl has long been considered as another
adolescent girl whose problems are the same as those of all
high school girls.
It is only within the last few years
that educators have realized the importance of the senior
year; and that the guidance of young people at this time
is most influential upon their outlook and course to be
followed in the future.
Research pertaining to the personal problems of high
school girls have given little consideration to the differ­
ences existing between the senior girl and high school
girls in general.
Until this information is at hand, the
necessary guidance is limited.
I.
THE PROBLEM
Statement of the problem.
It was the purpose of
this study (1) to discover the nature of the problems .
which high school senior girls encounter relating to their
personal difficulties; (2) to find which problems are of
the greatest significance, and those which are of the
most serious nature; (3) to learn the effectiveness of
the guidance methods used to solve these problems; and
(4) to determine what implications may be found in
2
adjusting the school program to meet these needs*
Importance of the study*
That there is a growing
emphasis in education upon the need of guidance cannot he
denied.
Cox**' states that "among the educational movements
in the twentieth century that of guidance has taken a first
place*”
But he stresses the fact that much progress is
needed; and that changes in educational methods must he de­
vised if guidance is to he effective.
He further states that:
If the secondary school could really he organized and
planned in terms of its stated objectives; if success in
high school were actually to he regarded as improvement
in health, true fundamentals, home membership, vocational
preparation, citizenship, uses of leisure, and ethical
character, personnel problems would he possible of so­
lution. But the academic tradition remains in control of
marks, promotions, and graduation.2
In analyzing the functions of the high school, Whipple
sees the importance of directing the high school student in
further educational work.
He declares that:
One of the major guidance problems of students in the
eleventh and twelfth grades should he that of becoming
informed concerning educational practices of occupational
opportunities that lie beyond the years of the senior
high school. Too often the choice of a higher
■*\P. W. L. Cox and John Carr Duff, Guidance by the
Classroom Teacher (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1938*77 P*
2Ibid., p. 36.
Guy Montrose Whipple, "Guidance in Educational
Institutions,” Thirty-Eifth Yearbook of the National
Society for the Study of Education, Part I, 1938, p. 152.
3
institution is based upon geographical location,
personal friendships, or popular opinion, rather than
upon the actual facts regarding student life, living
facilities, educational resources, quality of the
instructional staff, the advantages or disadvantages of
coeducation and the extent to which the institution may
contribute to the individual plans and the progress of
the students.^
If, at the time the senior girl, is graduating from
high school, she is struggling with tensions and conflicts,
due to unsolved problems, she is inadequately prepared to
meet and adjust herself to new difficulties when she no
longer has the school to rely upon for guidance.
at a loss to manage self-direction.
She is
Many who graduate
from high school consider their education complete, and
thus have no further educational guidance toward attaining
a well-adjusted life.
Those who seek higher training not
only need to have definite purposes and tasks in mind, but
need also*wholesome and integrated personalities to avoid
failures which are possible in institutions of higher
learning.
The integrated personality, according to Thorpe,
is one "characterized by unity of action in which the. re­
sponses of parts or aspects have meaning only in terms of
their relation to a central self and in harmony with the
^Loc. cit.
Louis P. Thorpe, Psychological Foundations of
Personality (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., 1938),
p. 553.
4
ft
plans and purposes of the individual concerned*w
The service which the high school provides should be
an individual matter, taking into consideration that each
pupil is an individual personality, with individually
different needs*
The school is responsible for the ' ~
development of the student's innate capacity, her attitudes
and outlooks, and her ability to grow*
This function is
made more possible by the discovery of the personal problems
of the students.
To meet the
needs of the senior girl, therefore, the
school must learn the nature of the girls' problems from
their point of view; and from this information work toward
the development of those ideals, values, and methods of
adjustment, which will enable her to live a better adjusted
and more enriched life.
Morgan
n
expresses the objective of adjustment as:
From the simplest to the most complex phase of life,
conflict is the normal order of the day. The objective
of adjustment is not to enable the child to avoid
conflict, but to select such modes of response as will
provide the best solution for each dilemma as it arises.
If neither the child nor the adults have any clear
conception of the elements at issue, or of the different
possible ways of meeting the issue, the child must de­
pend upon chance or the experiences he has gained in
similar situations in the past. In some instances this
sLoc cit*
7J. H. B. Morgan, Child Psychology
Farrar and Rinehart, Inc., 1934), p. 454.
(New York:
5
method is costly; and, for this reason, it may be a
worthy task to analyze the types of problems the child
must face, and to make a survey of the ways in which he
may respond when confronted with them.8
II.
Personal.
DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED
The meaning of the word was interpreted
as pertaining to self.
It included the problems belonging
to each girl exclusively, in relation to her private
affairs of everyday life.
Problem.
The word has been used to refer to a felt
need or difficulty, that which has prevented an adequate
adjustment, and has thus causes conflicts and. tensions.
Guidance.
Cox
9
The interpretation used here is that of
who has defined guidance as "the methodology of self­
adjustment and, hence, of true education."
"Problemsire.n
The term has been used to denote
the instrument used to secure the data which indicate the
senior girls’ personal problems.
The "problemsire" was
developed through a series of investigations which desig­
nated the difficulties.
The wording was developed
Loc.cit.
9
P. W. L. Cox and John Carr Duff, Guidance by the
Classroom Teacher (New Yorks Prentice-Hall, 1938)7 P*
6
according to the preliminary investigetion.
III.
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
Scope of the study.
The range of the study in­
cluded 335 senior girls in three senior high schools of
Los Angeles County,
The study of guidance methods in
dealing with the problems was conducted in the same
schools.
Details concerning the choice of schools are
explained in the section of the study pertaining to the
groups studied.
The purpose was to secure an adequate
sampling of senior girls <having different types of
background^, in schools of varied economic status.
Weaknesses of the study.
To determine the nature
of problems which the individual hesitates to admit,
even to herself, is a delicate task, and yet one if
satisfactorily accomplished
toward effective guidance.
offers many opportunites
That the material would be
reliable the senior girls were assured that no attempt
would be made to identify any paper.
They were fully
informed as to the purpose of the study, its value,
and the need of their co-operation.
The nproblemairen was composed of the following
divisions:
school life, home life, boy and girl re­
lationships, vocation, friends, religion, health,
7
recreation, money, eloth.es, and miscellaneous problems.
The statements of the "probleraaire" were worded
as nearly as possible to those indicated by the girls in
the preliminary investigation.
The danger that the
statements might be misinterpreted, however, was possible.
In the attempt to cover all difficulties felt by the girls,
there was a tendency toward overlapping in the statements;
but it was hoped that any repetition would tend to m£ke
the girls recognize difficulties which otherwise might be
overlooked.
In formulating the "problemsire" from the original
essay problems, there existed the danger of eliminating
some difficulties which would be important to certain
students.
It was also possible that the preliminary in­
vestigation might not include all needs.
To meet these
situations space was provided at the end of the "prob­
lems ire" for additional problems which, the girls felt,
were not expressed.
IV.
ORGANIZATION OF THU REMAINDER OF THE THESIS
Chapter II is devoted to a survey of the related
literature.
Chapter III presents a description of the
method of procedure used in the formulation of the
"problemsire? and its administration in final form.
Chapter XV contains an analysis of the problems indicated
8
by the girls in relation to those most frequently re­
ported and those which were considered by the girls to
be most ser ious.
Chapter V presents an analysis of
the guidance methods reported by the counselors in the
schools studied, and their effectiveness in meeting
the girls* problems.
Chapter VI contains a summary of
the findings of the study, with conclusions and recom­
mendations .
The Appendix consists of copies of the "problemaire,**
instructions to the counselors in the administration of
the wproblemaire,w and the outline for guidance methods
which was to be filled in by the counselors.
CHAPTER
II
REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
A research of the literature forming the background
for this study reveals that considerable material has been
wit ten pertaining to the present investigation.
Only a
brief summary of the work of investigators on material most
closely related to the one at hand will be presented.
I.
INVESTIG-ATIVH LITERATURE
In recent years a number of authorities have endeavored
to determine the nature of problems of high school students
and the characteristics of the adolescent.
Some have studied
exelusibely the personal problems of girls of this age, while
others have dealt with their educational, home, and social
environments.
None, however, has been found to consider the
senior girl as a separate unit.
Questionnaire studies.
An analysis of the problems of
adolescent girls was recently made by Austin.1
Her investi­
gation was to determine the problems of a group of 800 high
school girls, chosen at random, in a city near Los Angeles.
Mary Alice Austin, ”An Analysis of Certain Personal
Problems of an Unselected Group of High School Girls,” (un
published Master’s thesis, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1937), 310 pp.
10
The girls indicated, by means of a questionnaire, their
environment, personality traits, health, home and school
relationships, friendships, leisure-time activities,
finane©.3, and religion.
The results of the study reveal that home difficulties
were considered the greatest problems to the girls; and
problems relating to the plans of the future troubled them
the least.
The A 12 reported the largest number of problems;
and the A 10 and A 11 girls were next in number.
Many sug­
gestions were offered by the girls wherein the school might
be improved.
Reedy, 2 in a similar study of personal problems of
high school students, approached the study by the method of
a questionnaire in which a group of 363 girls and boys indi­
cated their difficulties in home and school relationships.
It was the purpose of her study to discover the students’
problems as a means of help to individual counseling; and
to assist in creating conditions in the home and school
which would aid in the solving of these problems.
Prom the problems listed in her questionnaire it was
found that the most important to the group studied were,
%olla A. Reedy, "A Study of the Personal Problems of
High School Students,” (unpublished Master’s thesis, The
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1937), 56 pp.
11
how to develop a desirable personality for the girl, and
how to find the right vocation for the boy.
Although the
boys were more interested than the girls in finding the
right vocation, yet the girls considered the problem of
vocation second to personality development.
5
Andrus , in a dissertation, summarized the results
of a study of girls and their needs as a basis for a course
of study for high school girls.
Questionnaires were sent to
3,000 girls who were asked to state their opinions about
marriage, parenthood, curriculum offerings which they had
found most helpful, avocations, and plans for the future.
There wer'e 2,518 questionnaires answered.
The conclusions
of her study indicate that high school girls are in need
of the following:
1. Helpful guidance in matters concerning social
relations, personal conduct, marriage, and the question of
sex.
2. Vocational guidance which will satisfy them as
to personal and social needs and reasonable wages.
3. School courses which will help them in the com­
munity, the home, and personally.
The attitudes of girls toward their high schools
3
Ethel PI Andrus, wThe Development of an Educational
Program for the High School Girl Based on a Critical Study
of Her Nature and Her Needs,?f (unpublished Doctor’s disser­
tation, The University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
1930), 484 pp.
IB
differ.
Many girls have a somewhat skeptical attitude
regarding the lack of effort of the secondary school in
solving problems of vital interest to them.
4
Stephan’s study was that of discovering the mental
health problems of girls.
three investigations.
This was undertaken through
The first part of the study was an
analysis of the questions turned in by the physical education
classes at Gerdena High School.
A tabulation was made of
the questions from the ninth to the twelfth grades, inclu­
sive.
It was found that the major problems of the girls
was that of boy and girl relationships.
A different existed
between the problems of ninth grade girls and those of other
high school girls in that the ninth grade girls had more
conflicts in the home relationship, a greater desire for
sex knowledge, and a rapidly awakening interest in the boys.
The second part of the study was to find out if the
girls at Gardena High School had problems which were closely
related to their environment.
A comparison was made of the
questions of Gardena girls with the questions handed in by
girls at Chaffey Union High School.
The results revealed
that three problems were present at Gardena that had not
been mentioned at Chaffey;
namely, family relationships,
^Frances Stephan, ”An Investigation of the Mental
Health Problems of the Girls of Gardena High School,”
(unpublished Master’s thesis, The University of SouthernCalifornia, Los Angeles, 1936), 119 pp.
13
personality development, etiquette, and problems of re­
ligion.
It is significant that questions concerning boy
and girl relationships were the most frequently asked in
each school. .
The third part of the study was to find out the.re­
lationship between worthy home membership and mental health
problems.
This was done by a tabulation of ninth and tenth
grade merit records and making a comparison of the two.
It
was disclosed that the ninth grade girls committed more
than four times as many offenses as the tenth grade girls.
5
Kent , in a study of problems of girls at Chaffey
Union High School, attempted to make an analysis of the
need for instruction .in family relationships; and analyze
the courses now being taught in the secondary schools.
From the findings she suggested a plan for a unit of study •
in family relationships including methods of teaching and
'materials which might be utilized.
Her investigation con­
sisted of a tabulation of 313 questions presented through
the "Question Bo2" in Chaffey Union High School, which
reveal the following%
1.
Of all the questions, 39 per cent related to
boy and girl relationships.
5
Lois Kent, "Teaching of Family Relationships in
Secondary Schools," (unpublished Master’s thesis, The
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1933), p. 37.
14
2. Medical information received 19 per cent.
3. Marriage received 7 per cent.
4. Sex matters received 7 per cent.
5. Friendship received 5 per cent.
6. Smoking received 4 per cent.
7. Various recreations received 2 per cent.
8. Venereal diseases received 1 per cent.
9. Occupations and professions received 1 per cent.
The results show that while 39 per cent of the
questions had to do with hoy and girl relationships, prac­
tically all fields of social endeavor were ^questioned.
By means of an attitude questionnaire Jones^ collected
data concerning the attitudes of young people toward their
parents.
This included personal data, home relationships*
parent relationships, social relationships, attitudes and
habits, problems of young people, and general criticisms.
The group studied consisted of 440 cases, 219 of which were
girls, and 221 boys.
There were 306 pupils living in normal
homes, and 134 in broken homes.
The following were selected
by the group as the five most outstanding shortcomings.of
the parents of today.
^Maud M. Jones, "An Investigation of the Adjustment
Problems of High School Pupils," (unpublished Master’s thesis,
The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1934),
95 pp.
15
Parents do not give their children adequate sex
instruction.
Parents worry too much over their children.
Parents believe that the younger generation is
"going to the dogs."
Parents do not give their children enough
responsibility.
Parents are not pals to their children.
In a comparative study and analysis of the problems
of girls from the ninth to the tv/elfth grade inclusive,
7
Kast secured the attitudes of the girls through a
questionnaire which was divided into the following fields:
personal data, home relationships, parent relationships,
social relationships, school relationships, health, church
relationships, habits, attitudes, problems of young people,
and the suggested criticisms of today.
The data included
the girls from one union high school consisting of 562
girls, 160 freshmen, 138 -sophomores, 146 juniors, and 117
seniors.
The conclusions were that unhappy homes and an un­
happy childhood are less often due to the economic distress
in the home than to the critical attitude of the parents
toward one another, and the unsympathetic understanding
which results from signs of favoritism.
The evidence
showed that the differences were more largely affected by
7Emma J. Kast, "A Comparative Study and Analysis of
the Problems of Girls in a Four-Year High School," (un­
published Master’s thesis, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1936), 151 pp.
16
the age of the respondents than by school grade.
Her
recommendations from the study were that the school’s
curriculum include courses in which citizenship, hygiene,
and home problems are given serious consideration.
Leonard8 made a study of social problems of freshman
girls for the purpose ‘of discovering what they felt-to be
the best preparation for college life.
She included an
investigation of mother-daughter relationships to determine
the correlation between the girls’ answers and the mothers’
indications of their problems.
Her data were gathered from
a brief questionnaire compiled from assembled questions
snd submitted to one hundred freshman girls, of which fifty
were later given short interviews, and identical question­
naires sent >to the mothers of the girls who took part in the
study.
The questionnaire included the following areas:
academic pursuits, girl, and boy relationships, recreation,
t
clothes and personal adornment, religion, sex life, vo­
cational aspiration, use of,money, contacts with home, m d
health habits.
It was found that sixty-nine per cent of
the girls’ responses to the questionnaires agreed with
their responses in the interviews.
There existed a sixty-
three per cent agreement between the responses of the girls
and their mothers.
8Eugenie A. Leonard, Problems of Freshman College
Girls (Hew York: Teachers College, Columbia University,
1932), p. 139.
17
Jobe
q
endeavored to determine the responsibility of
the secondary school in preparing youth for marriage.
An
investigation was made of the available courses of study,
class activities, principals* opinions, and current liter­
ature dealing with the training for marriage.
A check­
list, containing opinions and practices in the field of
education for marriage, was submitted to approximately onethird of the high school principals in California; and
instructors of marriage problems classes of four selected
high schools were interviewed.
The principals’ responses showed that more than half
the schools offered courses, some part of which was devoted
to educating for marriage.
However, only £8.4 per cent of
the schools reporting offered a special course on marriage;
and in only 8*1 per cent of the schools were pupils re­
quired to take such instruction.
Of the school repre­
sented in this study, 55.4 per cent are offering a course
in which most of the tpics submitted in the check-list
are included.
Her recommendations are that:'
there is definite
need for more well trained teachers to give instruction
for marriage; more books are needed for pupil reference;
Claire W. Jobe, ’’Education for Marriage in Second­
ary Schools,” (unpublished Master’s thesis, The University
of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1938), 143 pp.
18
there is a need of educating not only the pupils but also
the parents and other adults of the community.
Symonds*^ made a study of the interests and con­
cerns of young people, based on the replies from 1,641
adolescents to a questionnaire.
the areas of:
The problems included
health, sex adjustment, safety, money,
mental hygiene, study habits, recreation, personal and
moral qualities, home and family relationships, manners
and courtesy, personal attractiveness, daily schedule,
civic interests, getting along with other people, and
philosophy of life.
The students were asked to rank
these areas according to the difficulty they cause in
their lives; the one causing most concern *'.ranking first*
The results indicated that the ranking had not
been solely on the basis of the students* personal
problems but as a consideration of the importance of these
problems to people in general.
found to be:
money, health, and personal attractiveness
(particularly to the girl.)
interest are:
ness.
The most important were
The items ranked highest for
recreation, health, and personal attractive­
The five items rated to be of least importance are:
sex, daily schedule, and civic interests.
M* Symonds, "Life Problems and Interests of
Adolescents," School Review, 44:506-518, September, 1936.
19
An attempt to locate and describe the crises and
tensions of adolescence is being made by Brown‘d through
the guidance program of the University High School at
Oakland,
The study is intended to find characteristics
which would be considered in planning adequate courses of
study for senior high school students.
methods of research are used:
The following
observations, stereo­
scopic pictures, hand-wrist x-rays, tests, questionnaires,
interests, case conference records, guidance records, and
anecdotal records.
The study reveals progress in independence and shows
the necessity of modifying guidance techniques as students
change.
Study of problems brought to deans.
An investi­
gation of the personal problems of adolescent girls was
recently made by Hertzler.^
Her thesis was to discover
^■Marion Brown, *fA Study of Adolescents in the Univer­
sity High School, Oakland, California,n _ Proceedings of the
Twenty-First Annual Meeting of the National Association of
Deans of Women (Washington, D. C.: National Association
of Deans of Women, June, 1937), pp. 112-121.
IP
Alverda Elizabeth Hertzler, nA Study of the Personal
Problems of High School Girls in Certain Southern California
Secondary Schools,” (unpublished Master's thesis, The
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1939), 194 pp.
so
the difficulties which adolescent girls encounter in various
areas of their lives, and to compare these findings with
the problems brought to the dean of girls.
For her in­
vestigation she composed an expressionnaire which was
given to S,079 girls in four senior high schools and one
junior college, of which 103 were freshmen, 613 sophomores,
900 juniors, and 463 seniors.
The study by the deans was
made in eleven schools and included 330 interviews.
areas covered in the expressionnaire were:
The
problems of school
life, home life, boy and girl relationships, recreation, ■?*.
friends, vocational choice, religion, health, clothes,
money, and miscellaneous problems•
The results of the investigation reveal that more
problems were reported in the areas of school life, home
life, boy and girl relatipnships, and money; the most
common problems of which were reported by from 42 per cent
to 52 per cent of the group.
In the areas of the other
problems the most commonly reported were from 21 per cent
to 27 per cent of the group.
In the comparison of problems
brought to the dean of girls with those of the expression­
naire it was found that they were closely paralleled.
There were some significant differences, however, betwen
the problems discovered by the dean in the interviews and
those recognized by the girls themselves.
21
Strang
, in an investigation of the problems of
adolescents which come to deans of girls, used the
records of approximately two thousand interviews with
the students concerning their personal problems.
These
were noted during one month by twenty-seven deans on all
educational levels in the State of New York.
fication of problems included:
The classi­
academic, attendance,
behavior, personal, health, social adjustment, and finances.
The summary showed that the amount of time given
to each pupil is insufficient to help individuals to
acquire the knowledge and techniques needed in solving
their own problems.
From 194 cases of behavior difficulties recorded
-in these interviews it was found that most were concerned
with disobedience, stealing, and cheating.
The majority
of the interviews dealing with behavior problems were
involuntary.
Case studies.
By means of extensive case studies
Smithies^ investigated the problems of normal adolescent
1^
R. M. Strang, "Problems of Adolescents Which
Come to Deans,n Junior Senior High School Clearing House,
7:29-34, September, 1932.
14
Elsie May Smithies, Case Studies of Norma 1
Adolescent Girls (New York: AppletonSCentury Co., 1933},
277 pp.
22
girls to determine the typical problems met in the home
and school situations.
Eleven cases are presented as
representing typical maladjustment, in which are outlined
symptoms, approaches, methods of adjustment, and results
obtained.
cerning:
The cases shown represent maladjustments con­
self-distrust, superior girl, physical disability,
exhibitionism, volitional retardation, depression, inse­
curity, environmental pressure, parental dominance, shame,
and inferiority fear.
She concludes from her study that personal inter­
est, curriculum adjustments, changes of environment, and
arousal of the desire on the part of the individual for
a fuller life, are the factors which lead to satisfactory
living*
Zachry 15 analyzes cases of maladjustment and the
factors causing them.
Mechanisms of adjustment, through
a study of individual case histories, are described as being
the result of the .’effort that the individual makes to ad­
just his biological inheritance to his social environment.
These are stated to be the beginning of serious disorders.
Her study reveals that maladjusted children have
feelings of insecurity which lead to much mental distress.
15Caroline B. Zachry, Personality Adjustments of
School Children (New York: Charles ><Scribnerfs Sons, 1929),
£98 pp.
23
Suggestions are made for the constructive development of
personality through the curriculum,
II.
GENERAL LITERATURE
Adolescence, Much literature of recent years deals
with adolescence.
Although authorities differ on minor
points their attitudes on fundamental factors are essentially
the same,
A number of studies on adolescence by the various
commissions have been made.
These have attempted to survey
and summarize the needs and problems of youth.
Douglass
16
,
in a report to the American Youth Commission, makes a summary
of this nature.
The most important problems and needs of
youth he claims to be;
to find a satisfying place among
fellow youths, to experience personal achievement, to enter
into and succeed in vocational life, to be able to estab­
lish and enjoy a happy home, to understand an improve po­
litical and economic conditions, to participate in enjoyable
recreational activities, and to find a satisfying philosophy
of life.
To meet these needs he has recommended a complete
program for the reorganization of the secondary sc'hools,
i ft
Harl Douglass, "Secondary Education for Youth m
Modern America," A Report to the American Youth Commission
of the American Council on Education .(Washington, D. C.:
193777 137 pp.
24
Bigelow17 , limiting the age of adolescence as be­
tween twelve and twenty, maintains that adolescence is
the important period of life in which each individual is
completing his physical, mental, and social preparation
for his part as a citizen*
It is rhis belief that the
school should teach fundamental facts by presenting curriculums including courses in biology and social sciences,
physical education, health education, household arts,
general literature, and psychology*
1 ft
Arlitt
emphasizes the need of training adolescents
emotionally*
He contends that only the emotionally mature
adult can expect to lead an adjusted life*
The aid of
the physician, psychologist, and psychiatrist may be neces­
sary as the emotional development with which the child
leaves adolescence will probably last him throughout life*
The parents’ help in guiding the adolescent is
considered of major importance*
Youth cannot always be
kept away from people who have bad habits, but they can
be so well trained at home, and have so much confidence
in their parents that the contacts of questionable nature
will have little effect*
17
Maurice A. Bigelow, Adolescence (New York:
and Wagnalls Co., 1937), 99 pp*
1ft
Ada Hart Arlitt, The Adolescent (New York:
Hill Book Co., 1933), 242 pp.
Funk
McGraw-
25
Psychology*
In a study of problems of health and
19
emotional development Pressey
cites examples in which
he points out that less than one-third of the children
are free from physical defects, one-third have minor
difficulties, and the remaining third are seriously handi­
capped by ill health or defects of some sort*
He states that this is a condition which presents a
serious handicap to child learning, that it is a challenge
to school health programs, that it involves disciplinary
problems, and that physical handicaps have important,
though often neglected, long-time effects upon the de­
velopment of personality which are frequently determining
influences upon the individual^ career*
Morgan^, in dealing with the psychology of the
maladjusted child, gives a mental hygiene program with
concrete suggestions for assisting him toward adjustment*
He states that the chief need of young people is to have
insight into personal lives; and that the "main object of
education is to fit an individual to become successful in
his personal relations with his fellows*"
21
1Q
S* L* Pressey, Psychology and the Hew Education
(Hew York: Harper Brothers, 1933J, 594 pp*
PO
° I. H. B. Morgan, The Psychology of the Unadjusted
School Child (New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936), 339 pp.
^ Ibid*, p . 7 *
26
Averill2^ summarizes factors in the lives of adol­
escents which lead to delinquency as:
loss of loyalty
and security in the home situation, drabness of home en­
vironment as compared with glitter of cheap amusements,
natural craving for adventure, focusing of limelight, the
appeals of easy wealth, bad associates and influences,
boredom arising out of idleness and an easy environment,
and physical deficiencies and abnormalities.
Mental hygiene.
According to Sherman 23 the problems
mentioned most frequently in mental hygiene literature in­
clude those of economic handicap, physical handicap, mental
handicap, racial handicap, broken homes, parental ignorance
and indifference, chronic illness in the family, chronic
intoxication in the family, family tension, parental domi­
nation, parental over-solicitousness, minority group handi­
cap, hereditary constitutional factors, and bad companions.
24
Witty and Skinner
declare that the schools are
primarily concerned with the conformity of children to
academic requirements rather than with the development of
personalities ready to cope with new or troublesome social
situations.
They contend that mental hygiene is a means
of forming a reconciliation between children’s physical
S2L* A. Averill, Adolescence (Cambridge, Massachusetts
Houghton Mifflin Co., 1936), 495 pp.
23Mandel Sherman, Mental Hygiene and Education
(New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1934), 320 pp.
27
mental, social, and emotional drives at an integrated,
well-balanced orientation to life; and that the dis­
tinguishing characteristic of the hygienic approach in
education is the nature and amount of wholesome growth it
engenders.
The. primary aim of mental hygiene, according to
Burnham 25 , is the preservation and development of a
wholesome personality and the prevention of personality
disorders.
It is his belief that the period when mental
conflict is liable to be most common is that of puberty
and adolescence; and that the storm and stress of this
period cause conflict which is often intensely emotional.
The positive and preventive measures of mental
hygiene are emphasized by Symonds. 28 He states helpful
suggestions and instructions regarding the teacher’s part
in developing mental hygiene:
It has been estimated that one out of twenty-two
'“ persons'"becomes a patient in a hospital for mental
diseases in a generation or lifetime, and that the
chances of a white person fifteen years old contracting
a
s4:Paul A. Witty and Charles E. Skinner and Others,
Mental Hygiene in Modern Education (New York: Farrar and
Rinehart, 1939), 539 pp.
85
¥/illiam H. Burnham, The Wholesome Persona
(Hew Tork: D. Appleton-Century Co., Inc., 193S ),713 pp.
28
a psychosis or a severe incapacitating neurosis during
a lifetime, whether sent to a hospital for mental
diseases or not, are -somewhere near one in ten. These
tendencies toward instability are increasing, as evi­
denced by a growth in the attendance at mental hospi­
tals greater than the growth of the general population.27
The study of literature pertaining to the problems
of senior girls has given evidence that a consideration
of the needs of high school girls in general has not been
neglected.
Particularly is this true of the nature of the
adolescent girl, wherein a wealth of material is now
available.
To what extent the past investigations are
related, and their value to the present investigation will
be cited in the conclusions of this study.
26
P. M. Symonds, Mental Hygiene of the School Child
(New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936), 301 pp.
27Xbid., p. 8.
CHAPTER
III
THE MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES OF THE STUDY
This chapter is devoted to a discussion of the
procedure in the development of the ’’problemsire,n the
methods used in its administration to secure the neces­
sary data, an analysis of the groups studied, and an
interpretation of the findings.
It includes the steps
taken to determine the adequacy of the guidance methods
used In the schools studied with the results of the
"problemsire,"
For this type of study a method was sought
whereby the girls would have an opportunity to express
their innermost difficulties and needs, knowing all such
expressions would be confidential, and used solely to
help future high school girls overcome the same puzzling
annoyances.
A form of questionnaire was decided upon to
accomplish this purpose.
Because the function of the
questionnaire was to determine the kinds of problems
senior girls encounter, and because the name might be
inspirational and intriguing to the girls, when the
questionnaire was presented to them to answer, the name
of "problemsire" was decided upon by the investigator.
30
I.
THIS F0BMUIATI0H OF THE "PROBLEMAIRS" AND METHODS USED
The development of the "problems ires:" A study of
the everyday life of high school senior girls- revealed
the fact that their interests naturally fall within
certain major areas.
These include:
school life, home
life, boy and girl relationships, vocation, friends,
religion,.health, recreation, money, clothes, and miscel­
laneous*
To obtain a free, unbiased expression of the girls,
concerning their personal problems, the essay method of
writing problems was decided upon as a preliminary step.
The investigator secured unruled paper, twelve by eight
and a half inches in size, which was taken to three senior
high schools for the writing of this material*
After
explaining the purpose of the study, the value of its
contribution, and the secrecy of the replies, the girls
were asked to write their problems under the headings
mentioned.
When the papers from the three schools were in the
hands of the investigator, a study was made of the answers
toward the formulation of the "problemsire."
By the nature of the replies certain characteristics
of the preliminary "problemsire" were apparent.
Several
factors made it evident that the girls had taken the
31
reguest seriously, with a very fine attitude of co-oper­
ation,
There was no element of flippancy in the answers.
As the girls wrote their problems they offered suggestions
whereby they thought their difficulties might be eased.
In several cases, in the school wherein the investigator
administered the research, the advice of the investigator ,
and her help towahd solving their problems, were reguested.
Many of the essays were addressed to her, and were written
in the form of a friendly letter.
Typical expressions of
their appreciation include, "Thank you," and, ^It’s a re­
lief to let the excess run off!”
Another wrote, ”Like you-
I ’m very interested in youth’s problems and think it would
be very interesting to make such a study.”
Many girls
expressed a wholesome attitude in stating that in a measure
they might be wrong in their outlook on some problems.
Some of. the papers were very emotional in nature, showing
anger about certain conditions; while others seemed des­
paired.
This was seen in statements such as, "Oh meJ”
and, "It is a terrible problem.”
San situations in the
home were related; some were appalling.
Essay papers were received from BIB girls who had
been chosen at random in the three schools.
There were
five girls who wrote that they had no problems.
The
essay writing ranged from a half sheet to three pages.
3B
Most difficulties were written out in detail.
Many were
lengthy discussions.
In tabulating the statements toward the formulation
of the "problemaire," it was thought that the girls would
recognize their own problems more easily, feel that ,the
"problemaire* was their own expression, and be more enthusi­
astic about co-operating, if the wording of the statements
in the "probt. emaire* were that of the essay papers.
The
statements, therefore, were worded as closely as possible
to those written by the girls in the preliminary investi­
gation.
To make the study as valuable as possible the most
serious problems as well as those most common were to be
determined.
The instructions requested the girls to indi­
cate their problems by placing a circle around the word
"Yes* in from of each statement which expressed a diffi­
culty to them, and "No* around those which did not.
To
indicate their most serious problems they were requested
to place the numbers from *1* to *3,"
according to the
degree of seriousness, in the space provided at the right
of each statement.
The compiled "problemaire,* when completed, was
submitted to a number of interested adults and a few high
school girls for their evaluations and suggestions.
After
considering their comments the final "problemaire" was
drawn up and mimeographed for administration.
Care was
taken to make the form as attractive, stimulating, and
easy to answer as possible.
A copy of the problemaire"
is in the appendix.
The completion of the "problemaire" required
approximately forty-five minutes.
Individual differences
made a wide range in the amount of time necessary.
The method of procedure. The preliminary step
toward collecting the data desired was to secure the
essay material of the girls’ problems, as already ex­
plained in the development of the "problemaire."
The investigator administered the preliminary research,
and the counselor the "problemaire," in the first of the
three buildings to be studied.
In the other two build­
ings the counselors made the request that they conduct
the study in their respective buildings as a part of
the classroom work.
Inasmuch as no identity of any girl*
paper was possible, and the typewritten instructions for
the essay material and for the finished "problemaire"
would make the procedure uniform, the request was granted
Therefore, a copy of the instructions used by the investi
gator in the preliminary study, along with the necessary
paper, were taken to the two schools where the counselors
administered the preliminary research, and, later, the
34
completed "problemaire* with instructions on the front
page, as a part of the work of the hygiene and senior problem
classes,
A copy of the instructions used to obtain the
essay material is in the appendix#
The groups studied.
The three schools selected
for the study are located in Los Angeles County.
are widely separated geographically.
They
The descrimination
of schools was due to the different economic status each
represents.
The purpose
the differences, if any,
of this method was to determine
in the number and types of
problems of the girls in the three buildings, which would
be due, possibly, to the environment in the communities
in which each of the schools are located.
The request was made that the names of the schools
be withheld.
Inasmuch as the guidance methods being used
to meet the girls’ problems would be evaluated, and con­
clusions drawn as to their effectiveness according to the
results of the "problemaire," the request seemed a logical
one to the investigator and therefore was granted.
The
school representing high economic status is designated
throughout the study as the
average economic status,
"A" school; the school of
as "B* school; and the school
of low economic status, as ”Cn school.
35
II.
DISTRIBUTION AND INTERPRETATION
Distribution*
The "problemaire** was answered by
335 high school senior girls.
This total consisted of;
104 ub "A" school, 111 in "B" school,■and 120 in "C*
school.
While not every senior girl in the three
buildings filled out a "problemaire," due to .-unavoidable
school adtivities at the time of the administration, the
counselors felt that the groups who responded in their
respective schools represented the typical senior girl,
and was an adequate sampling of all types of senior girls.
Differentiation of groups.
Of the 335 girls
answering the problemaire" there were five who did not
indicate their most serious problems when they had
finished denoting which were their problems at the left
of the statements of the "problemaire."
It seemed proba­
ble to the investigator that these girls were not through
at the end of the time allotted for answering the
"problemaire."
All five were from "C* school.
Thus the
number reporting their most serious problems amounted to
330.
The enrollment in the three schools varied, as did
the number of senior girls.
The relationship in size,
however, was close enough to consider their comparisons as
36
reliable.
According to size they ranked:
"C" school,
"B" school, and "A" school,
Interpretation of findings.
The representation
of high school senior girls which amounted to 335 in
the three senior high schools was considered by the
investigator to be an adequate sampling for the study
of senior girls’ personal problems because of the con­
centrated are© studied.
This consisted of one year of
school, the senior year, exclusively; and of girls
approximately the same age.
The response within all three schools was en­
thusiastic and co-operative, as was to be expected from
the nature of the preliminary papers.
The attitudes were
evidenced by the remarks written at the side of the state­
ments, and on the extra sheet at the end of the "problem­
aire*"
"How often should you have a date,” was the state­
ment receiving the most comments.
Several wrote the number
which they thought advisable; it was interesting to note
that in these cases the word "Yes" had a circle around it,
indicating it to be a problem.
are the following:
Typical of other remarks
by the statement, "How to keep the
friendship of a boy without drinking or ’necking’," was
written, "It isn’t necessary," and, "Don’t go the second
37
timeJ"
By the statement, "How to keep from feeling inferior
when your sister is more talented than you," was written,
"By developing other interests."
The question, "Should you
go to college when your grades are low?" was modified to
say, "If you know you will improve."
In several cases the
"Yes" at the left of the statement was heavily underlined
for emphasis, and the statement marked "1."
Mamy
girls
wrote on the extra sheet at the end of the "problemaire,"
"You have covered the problems very well."
The span in the number of problems was great,
ranging from two problems to one hundred and ninety-six;
both of which were in "B" school.
however, was close to one hundred.
The average number,
The difference in the
number of problems in the comparison of the three schools
is shown in the tables of the results of the "problemaire."
Although there was overlapping in the statements
there were problems listed on the additional sheet at the
end of the "problemaire" which had been included in the
different sections of the "problemaire."
This will be
discussed in the chapter dealing with the analysis of the
results of the study.
Comparison of results'and methods.
To determine
the adequacy of the guidance methods in the three schools
38
studied, according to the results of the "problemaire,n
an outline containing the same areas covered in the
"problemaire" was sent to the counselors of the respective
schools with the request that they indicate the methods
used to meet the problems.
The details of the procedure
and results are discussed in Chapter V.
CHAPTER
17
ANALYSIS OF THE RESULTS OF THE "PROBLEMAIRE" STUDY
This chapter is devoted to the presentation and
discussion of the results of the "problemaire," and a
resume of the findings.
Inasmuch as it would be inad­
visable to present all of the problems of the girls in
table form here, due to the bulk of the material, only
the ten most common and the ten most serious are presented,
and analyzed.
The nature of the remaining problems of the
"problemaire" are discussed in a general way.
To determine the ten most common problems, or the
ten problems which were reported by the largest number of
girls, each statement of the "problemaire" marked "Yes,"
scored one point.
The ten statements receiving the highest
scores, in each division, were considered to be the most
common.
In the interpretation of these tables the fact
must be kept in mind that in "Ranking by school" there
were seven more girls answering the "problemaire" in "B"
school than in "A" school, and nine more in "C" school
than in "B" school.
When the girls had indicated their problems, they
then designated which of them were of the most serious
nature.
The investigator determined the ten most serious
40
by allowing three points to the statements marked "1,"
two points to the statements marked "B," and one point
to those marked "3."
The ten receiving the highest
scores, in each division, were considered to be the
most serious.
This procedure of determining the most
serious problems were used because of the fact that the
instructions on the "problemaire" were interpreted
differently by the girls taking the test.
In each school
the girls used one of two methods to indicate their most
serious problems.
Some understood the instructions to
mean that only the three most serious in each section
should be indicated, which was the intention of the In­
vestigator; while others thought the request was to allow
to each of their problems a relative degree of seriousness,
and thus mark each problem in the sections either "1," *S,"
or "3."
As the percentage of girls using each of these
procedures was not the ssme in the three schools, the
total sum of each statement was the basis for judging the
ten most serious problems.
"Ranking by school," therefore,
was not included in the tables of the most serious problems
as it would be meaningless, due to the two different in­
terpretations .
In summary, the tables of the most common problems
indicate which statements represent difficulties to the
largest number of girls; and the tables of the most
41
serious represent which them the most trouble.
Problems of school life.
The ten most common
and the ten most serious problems of school life, are
centered around the girls* present school conditions,
rather than about college life.
Not one of these
problems pertain to college training, even though the
"problemaire* was answered within two months of the close
of the senior year of school.
For the most part, the
interest was in the efficiency of their school work.
The
solution of such problems as,-"How to concentrate,"
"How
to budget your time when doing school work,"
"How to make
better grades," and I’How to become interested in subjects
you don’t like," and "How to stand up in front of the class
and give an oral report," would be a great help in future
schooling by aiding toward the acquisition of good work
habits, and healthy mental attitudes.
The highest rating problem of Table I, which is
rated third in Table II, indicates a need of change in
teaching methods, and possibly a change in curriculum.
When over half the girls feel the need of the experience
of appearing before others, it is indicative of a neces­
sity for more expression work in the previous grades to
build confidence, and eliminate self-cpnsciousness•
Disregarding this essential may result in serious emotional
TABU!
I
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS OF SCHOOL LIFE
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
6
9
10
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
How to become interested in subjects
you don*t like.
How to get more experience in appearing
before people.
How to concentrate.
How to stand up in front Of the class and
give an oral report.
How to get all of the home work done.
How to know which subjects will help you
most when you graduate from high school.
How to make better grades.
How to get your home work done without
staying up too late at night.
How to have a good time and keep up with
your school work.
. How to budget.your time when doing school.work.
Per
cent
Ranking by
sclhool*
A B C
225
67.1
65
78
82
£17
211
64.7
62.9
63
66
76
78
78
67
203
190
60.5
56.7
57
52
72
79
74
59
183
170
54.6
50.7
59
54
61
62
63
54
166
49.5
57
64
45
161
158
48.0
47.1
54
54
57
51
50
53
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
*A refers to the school of high economic status; B, to average economic status; and
C, to low economic status. This interpretation will be used in all of the tables of
the most common problems.
43
TABLE
IX
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF SCHOOL LIFE
Renk
'
Statementsof problem
1
How to get more experience in appearing
before people.
317
s.
How to concentrate*
312
5
How to become interested in submects
you don*t like*
292
How to stand up in front of the class
and give an oral report.
289
5
How to get all of the home work done.
269
6
How to know which subjects will help you
most when you graduate from high school.
253
How to get your home work done without
staying up too late at night.
241
8
How to make better grades.
219
9
How to prepare in high school to meet
life when you can*t go to college*
217
How to have a good time and keep up with
your school work.
.
216
<
4
7
.0
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
4:4:
distress*
The
most value
problem of knowing which subjects will be of
to them later is a
natural one*Solving the
vocational problems should in part ,eliminate this diffi­
culty* *
It is not surprising that, "How to prepare in high
school to meet life when you can’t go to college," is
listed among the serious problems, as it is a weighty
issue*
It reveals a feeling of inadequacy on the part of
the girls to meet life situations when they are no longer
dependent upon school supervision and guidance.
In "Ranking
difference
by school,” there exists a noticeable
between school ”B”
and the othertwo schools,
”B ” school being considerably above in the number worrying
over getting the home work done, which is consistent with
the problem of getting home work done without staying up
too late at night, wherein ”B" school is again much above
”C" school.
Problems of home life*
The first three problems
in Table III and Table IV are the same*
Furthermore,
with the exception of one in Table III,
HShould you work
for good grades to please your parents,” and one in Table
IV, "How to sit down with your mother and talk over your
problems with her,” the problems listed in both tables
are the same, but in a slightly different order.
TABLE
III
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Statement of problem
01
HOME LIFE
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A
B
C
182
54.3
55
65
62
155
46.2
51
65
39
132
39.4
39
43
50
124
37/0
28
56
40
117
34.9
42
41
34
112
112
33.4
33.4
34
32
43
44
35
36
106
31.6
25
38
43
103
30.7
24
48
31
99
29.5
22,
40
37
How to keep your parents from worrying
about you when you go out at night.
How to convince your parents that you appre­
ciate what they are doing for you.
How to get your folks to realize that you
are grown up.
Should you work for good grades to please
your parents?
How to have more companionship with your
parents.
How to get your parents to have more confi­
dence in you.
How to keep quarreling out of the home.
How to have a place to entertain your
friends.
How to get your work done at home and not be
too tired to study when you have finished it,
How to get your parents to let you take the
car.
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335•
46
TABLE
IV
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF HOME LIFE
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to keep your parents from worry*
ing about you when you go out at night.
292
How to convince your parents that you
appreciate what they are doing for you.
250
How to get your folks to realize that you
are grown up.
198
How to sit down with your mother and talk
over your problems with her.
190
How to have a place to entertain your
friends.
176
How to get your work done at home and not
be too tired to study when you have
finished it.
164
7
How to have more companionship with your
parents.
157
8
How to keep quarreling out of the home.
154
9
How to get your parents to let you take
the car.
149
How to get your parents to have more
confidence in you.-
148
2
3
4
5
6
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 530
47
Problem I, in both tables, "How to keep your
parents from worrying about you when you go out at night,"
is a matter which the girls should be taught to look- at
objectively, and should be frankly discussed with them.
With the exception of number 9, in Table III, and
number 6, in Table IV, all statements in both tables show
a lack of understanding between the girls and their parents,
or a lack of harmony in the home.
It is apparent, therefore,
that not only do girls need more guidance concerning these
matters in school, but the home must be contacted before a
complete understanding is attainable.
It is possible that to some extent the girls* de­
mands are unreasonable; but without the necessary com­
panionship of their parents, which they have expressed the
desire to have, it wouid be difficult to change their atti­
tudes,
"How to have a place to entertain your friends,"
is a problem of almost one-third of the girls.
If this
condition is neglected, the problems of boy and girl re­
lationships will become even more serious in nature,
"Ranking by school" shows three outstanding differ­
ences between schools. The girls in "C" school are less
interested in convincing their parents of their appreciation
than either of the other two schools;
the girls of "B"
school are more interested in working for good grades to
48
please their parents than those of "A* and "C" schools;
and the girls of "B" school seem to have more work to do
at home which interferes with their studying, than those
of "A** school.
Problems of boy and girl relationships.
It is
interesting to note that where there is a difference in
problems of the most common and the most serious, that the
common ones are not of such a grave nature as those
thought to be most serious.
Two assertionsi in:Table V,
the most common problems, would hardly be expected to
appear in Table VI, the most serious ones.
These are, "How
to feel at home with new boy friends," and "How to keep up
a conversation with a boy.”
The highest rating statement
in Table VI, "How to plan for marriage and a career, too,"
is not included in Table V.
It received a large score of
336 points, wrhich shows that while it is a real appre­
hension to some girls, it is not a source of anxiety to a
great many.
The only other problem im Table VI which is
not included in Table V, is number 10, "How to get ac­
quainted with the boys when you are new in school."
This
statement indicates that the newcomers in the building
need a way of becoming acquainted.
Although this condition
is easily corrected, its neglect is serious as it results
in feelings of inferiority.
All statements, in both tables, have received large
TABLE
THE TIN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS
Rank
T
OF
BOY AND GIRL RELATIONSHIPS
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
1
How to meet boys you would like to know.
£05
61.1
76
66
63
2
How to be popular.
182
54.3
66
63
53
3
166
49.5
62
59
45
5
How
you
How
are
How
155
155
46.2
46.2
51
61
55
53
49
41
6
How to refuse a date gracefully *
154
45.9
51
68
35
7
How to get acquainted with the boys.
146
43.5
53
52
41
8
How to feel at home with new boy friends.
142
42.3
40
58
44
9
How to keep up a conversation with a boy.
140
41.7
48
54
38
10
How to know if your boy friend is the one
you should marry.
135
.40.2
33
.63
39
4
to get the boys who are friendly with
to ask for a date.
to know what to talk about when you
out with the boy friend.
to get dates for the senior events.
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
50
TABUS
V I
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF BOY AND
GIRL RELATIONSHIPS
•
Score of
statement
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to plan for marriage and a career,
too.
336
Z
How to meet boys you would like to know.
290
3
How to be popular.
248
4
How to get dates for the senior events.
230
5
How to know what to talk about when you
are out with the boy friend*C
222
How to know if your boy friend is the
one you should marry.
218
How to get the boys who ©re friendly with
you to ask for a date.
216
8
How to refuse a date gracefully.
195
9
How to get acquainted with the boys.
193
How to get acquainted with the boys when
you are new in the school.
169
►
6
7
10
Total number reporting these problems most serious- -330
51
scores, the highest per cent in Table Y being 61.1; and
the lowest, 40.2*
There is a wide range in Table VI,
being 167 points.
The high scores of all statements
indicate, however, that all problems need considerable
attention.
Credit is due to-those who counsel and guide these
girls, because of the fact that while these problems seem
very significant to the.girls, they are of a wholesome
nature.
All are remediable within the school, and can be
handled right in the classroom. None of the ten most
common or serious problems deal with sex anzieties. Now
are the girls much troubled about the aquestion of drinking
or smoking.
It is improbable, due to the conditions under
which the questionnaire was administered, which have already
been explained, that they had reasons to withhold any
problems.
Table Y shows certain differences among schools con­
cerning boy and girl relationships.
Considering that there
were sixteen more girls answering the "problems ire" in "C"
school than in "A" school, the problem of getting dates for
the senior events was a minor annoyance in "C* school as
compared to that of "A" and "B.w schools.
This same condition
is true regarding the problem of refusing a date gracefully.
In knowing if "your boy friend is the one you should marry,"
WC” school ranks much below "B" school though not so far
52
below "A” school*
Problems of vocation.
The problems in Tables VII
and VIII are the same, with the exception of one in each
table.
They are, however, arranged in different order*
In Table VII, the most common problems, the statement,
"How to overcome timidity so it won’t be a hindrance to
your vocation," is the one not included in Table VIII,
the most serious ones.
This query is to be expected, ac­
cording to the girls’ expressions of lack of confidence,
which have already been mentioned in former tables.
The
same methods used in other sections to build confidence
would be useful here.
Not included in Table VII, but
presentr.in Table VIII, is the problem, "How 'to know if you
have any talent.”
Various kinds of tests, and individual
study and guidance are the answers to this inquiry.
The first problem in each table, "How to know what
jobs are open to high school graduates," which is a problem
to 61.1 per cent of the girls, and has a score of 329
points, would indicate, possibly, that many of the girls
hope to find work after graduation, rather than continue
further schooling.
Four of the ten problems in Table VII are infor­
mational, as are three of the ten in Table VIII.
These
include, "How to know what jobs are open to high school
graduates,” "How to apply for © job,” ’’How to know where to
TABLE
VII
THE TIN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS OF VOCATION
Hank
1
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Hanking by
school
A B C
205
61.1
58
80
67
BOB
193
60.2
57.6
49
52
@2
71
71
70
3
How to know what jobs are open to high
school graduates.
How to secure a job when so many are
without jobs.
How to apply for a job.
4
How to choose a vocation to suit you.
191
57.0
68
67
56
$
How. to know where to apply for a job.
188
56.1
48
80
60
6
How to, determine your ability when
choo^ihg a vocation.
171
51.0
64
55
52
How to have more poise so that you can hold
a good job.
168
50.1
55
67
46
8
How to have more faith in your future.
158
47.1
50
62
46
9
How to know more about unusual vocations.
152
45.3
56
52
44
10
How to overcome timidity so it won’t be a
Hindrance to your vocation.
149
44.4
37
63
49
2
7
Total number reporting these problems most common*— 335.
54
TABLE
¥111
THE TEH MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF VOCATION
Rank
Statement of the problem .
1
How to know what jobs are open to high
school graduates.
339
£
How to choose a vocation to suit you.
314
3
How to secure a job when so many are
without jobs.
292
4
How to know where to apply for a job.
277
5
How to apply for a job.
256
6
How to have more poise so that you can
hold a job.
239
How to determine your ability when
choosing a vocation.
230
How to overcome timidity so it wonft be
a hindrance to your vocation.
228
How to have more faith in your future.
210
How to know if you have any talent.
196
7
8
9
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
55
apply for a job," and in Table VII, "How to know more
about unusual vocations."
Certain problems in the two tables are of the
same nature; where this is the case they could be
handled at the same time.
In Table VII, problems 4 and 9
could be worked out together, "How to choose a vocation
to suit you," and, "How to know more about unusual voca­
tions."
The same applies to numbers 7 and 10, "How to
have more poise so that you can hold a good job," and,
"How to overcome timidity so that it won’t be a hindrance
to your vocation;"
and the solution, thereof, should help
toward answering numbers 2 and 8, "How to secure a job
when so many are without jobs," and, "How to have more
faith in your future."
In Table VIII, numbers
2 and 10 are remediable together, "How to choose a voca­
tion to suit you," and,
talent."
"How to know if you have any
The combinations of problems mentioned above in
regard to Table VII, and their solution, would also apply
to Table VIII.
"Ranking by school" reveals a number of marked
differences within the three schools." 'The girls in "B"
school were more anxious to know what jobs are open to
high school graduates than the girls of "A" and "C"
schools.
There was not the interest in "A" school in
"How to secure a job when so many are without jobs,"
56
that was evident in the other two schools;
nor were they
as interested in knowing how or where to apply for jobs*
In "B" school the girls were more worried as to the
hindrance of timidity in a vocation, than were the other
girls•
Problems -concerning friends.
The problems about
friends are centered around interests in the qualities
necessary to make new friends, rather than around the
troubles which ©rise among friends.
This is one indication
of good mental hygiene on the part of the girls.
In both of the tables concerning friends the
problems listed are the same, with the exception of one in
each table.
They are also
in much the same order.
The
problem in Table IX, the most ccmmon problems, which is
not included in Table X, the most serious ones, is, "How
to get a more friendly spirit in the .school."
Because
this query is more of an altruistic character than
personal, it would hardly be expected to appear among the
most serious difficulties.
It is interesting to note
that the tenth statement in Table X is not present in
Table IX, "How to learn to like people."
Probably, many
of the girls did not realize the close relationship
between, "How to make people like you,” which was a
problem to 45.0 per cent of the girls, and, "How to learn
to like people."
TABU
IX
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS CONCERNING FRIENDS
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
2
How to keep up a conversation when you
meet a new person.
How to make people like you*
175
151
52.2
45.0
56
56
62
48
57
47
3
How to make a wide circle of friends*
151
45.0
56
53
42
4
How to make friends easily.
136
40.5 '
45
47
44
5
How to make friends of the girls with whom
you would like to associate.
How to make friends when you are new in
the building.
How to act when you are with friends whom,
you feel, are above you socially.
How to get a more friendly spirit in the
school.
How to get into the best social cliques.
129
38.5
45
50
34
126
37.6
40
51
35
119
35.5
34
53
32
118
113
35.2
33.7
40
36
43
47
35
30
How to overcome sensitiveness so that you
can make more friends.
103
30.7
29
40
34
Rank
1
6
7
8
9
10
Statement of problem
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335*
tabu:
x
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBL5MS CONCERNING FRIENDS
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to make people like you.
261
2
How to keep up a conversation when you
meet a new person.
250
3
How to make a wide circle of friends.
198
4
How to make friends easily.
187
5
How to make friends of the girls with
whom you woujd like to associate.
186
How to make friends when you are new in
the building.
176
How to act when you are with friends whom
you feel, are above you socially.
174
8
How to get into the best social cliques.
173
9
How to overcome sensitiveness so that you
can make more friends.
145
How to learn to like people.
144
6
7
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
59
It is amusingly interesting to note that the
highest'rating problem in Table IX, which was rated
second in Table X, is, ffHow to keep up a conversation
when you meet a new person.”
This annoyance of over half
of the girls (52.S per cent) would probably dissolve
itself with experience, but should not be difficult to
remedy right in the classroom by practicing such situations.
The most serious problem in Table X, rated second
in Table3X, is rightfully first.
to make people like you.”
This statement is, nHow
In the endeavor to clear up this
difficulty it may be possible to teach the girls to look at
themselves objectively.
The solution of this problem is
the answer to almost all of the problems in the two tables.
It is a noticeable fact that the number of girls
reporting problems concerning friends in "C* school is
less than in either of the other schools.
every problem in Table IX.
This is true of
By deducting sixteen points
from },C W school, and seven from "B" school, to make up for
that number of extra girls answering the wproblemeirew
over nJkn school, it is apparent that the problems listed
were minor ones to the girls of ffCn school, when compared
to
and T,BM schools;
Particularly is this true of the
problems expressing a longing for a higher social standing,
such as getting into the best social cliques, knowing how
60
to act when with girls socially superior, making a wide
circle of friends, and getting a more friendly spirit
in the school.
Problems of religion.
The problems concerning
religion are such as would be expected from mature
thinking people.
They are all of a serious nature.
The
percentage of girls having problems about religion, how­
ever, is low in comparison to that of other sections.
That more girls are not troubled with religious diffi­
culties is encouraging; it is doubtful that the low
percentage is due to a lack of interest.
The statements of both tables are the same, with
the exception of one in the most common problems, Table XI,
"How to see good in each religion,1* and one in the most
serious, -Table XII, "How to find a church that will fit
your needs.*
Beligious problems are more difficult to handly
through the school than any other types of problems.
Obviously, it is not wise to discuss religion in the
classroom; nor can the counselor be of much service here*
The best method of dealing with these troubles is through
an indirect approach, that of teaching wholesome atti­
tudes, outlooks, and ways of living.
Through this process
the girls can find answers to such as, "How to live up to
TABLE
XI
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS OF RELIGION
Rank
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
1
How to live up to your religious ideals.
87
25.9
25
30
32
2
How to know what you should really
believe.
How to understand religion.
81
80
24.1
23.8
28
21
32
33
21
26
5
How to know if you should marry a boy
of a different religion.
How to have faith in religion.
75
73
22.3
21.7
17
19
31
31
27
23
6
How to have time for religious activities.
58
17.3
18
16
24
7
How to get yourself to go to church.
57
17.0
11
18
28
8
How to see good in each religion.
54
16.1
13
23
18
9
How to have more religion in the home.
44
13.1
11
13
20
10
How to have religion in the school.
43
12.8
09
19
15
3
4
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
62
TABUS
XXI
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF RELIGION
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to know what you should really
believe.
184
How to know if you should marry a boy of
a different religion.
168
3
How to live up to your religious ideals.
154
4
How to understand religion.
145
5
How to have faith in religion.
124
6
How to get yourself to go to church.
110
7
How to have time for religious activities.
80
8
How to have more religion in the home.
76
9
How to find a church that will fit your
needs•
66
How to have religion in the school.
66
2
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious--330
63
your religious ideals," "How to see good in each religion,1*
and, "How to have more religion in the home,"
Encouraging
the girls to attend their respective churches and seek
help there to answer the problems not possible ‘".of manag­
ing in the school, is another avenue toward satisfactory
adjustments.
In comparing the number of girls reporting re­
ligious difficulties in each school, it is found that
they are closely related.
The number in WCW school, how­
ever, is comparatively less than in the other schools.
Particularly is this true in the questions of having re­
ligion in the school, seeing good in each religion, and
having more .religion in the homes*
Problems of health.
A comparison of the two tables
on health problems reveals that the first five statements
in each table are the same.
Number six of the most common
problems, Table XIII, ,fHow to know what causes a headache,"
is not included in the most serious ones, Table XIV; nor
is number nine, "How to know what medicines you should
take."
The first statement mentioned above is a problem
to 27.4 per cent of the girls.
It may be indicative of a
need of glasses, or of irregular health habits such as
lack of sleep or improper eating.
The girls with this
ailment would probably be glad to let this condition be
TABLE
XIII
THE TEH MOST COMMON PROBLEMS 0? HEALTH
Hank
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
1
How to take care of your skin*
157
46.8
49
62
46
2
How to keep from being tired in school*
147
43.8
60
53
34
3
How to reduce without harming your health*
104
31.0
31
39
34
4
5
How to do your home work without weakening
your eyes*
How to keep from being susceptible to colds
99
:95
29.5
28.3
38
29
32
39
29
27
6
How to know what causes a headache.
92
27.4
27
27
38
7
8
How to keep your health when you have so
much to do at home and at school.
How to increase your weight.
73
60
21.7
17.9
27
18
23
20
23
22
9
How to know what medicines you should take.
50
14.9
06
23
21
10
How to keep poor health from being a handi­
cap to your future.
44
13.1
10
23
11
Total number reporting these problems most common--335*
65
TABLE
XIV
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF HEALTH
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to take care of your skin*
302
2
How to keep from being tired in school.
274
3
How to reduce without harming your health. 208
4
How to do your home work without weaken­
ing your eyes.
193
How to keep from being susceptible to
colds.
149
6
How to increase your weight.
129
7
How to keep your health when you have so
much to do at home and at school.
99
How to keep poor health from being a
handicap to your future.
60
How to plan your future when you know
that you have a permanent physical defect.
44
How to have fun with people when you
have poor health.
41
5
8
9
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
66
known so that they could receive individual attention.
The second statement is not one for the school to
handle, except that the
girls should he warned against
the dangers of relying, upon advertisements, and should
be taught the importance of taking medicines under the
doctor1s orders.
The two most serious problems not included among
these most common are apparently problems to a small
number og girls; but, nevertheless, are very serious
difficulties to those having permanent physical handi­
caps.
Help, in the manner of developing interests which
would be worthwhile to these girls later, would alleviate
the anxiety felt by these girls.
The treating of health problems is relatively a
simple matter in comparison to other types of problems,
in that there is practically nothing secretive about
health weaknesses.
Not one problem listed in either
table would be difficult to handle in the classroom.
Most of them have arisen from a lack of knowledge of sub­
ject matter.
There is a close relationship in the number of
girls reporting health problems within the three
buildings.
Where there is a conspicuous difference it
concerns fatigue, due to the amount of school work to be
67
done.
Less girls in "Cw school suffer from troubles
involving:
"How to keep from being tired in school,*
"How to do your home work without weakening your eyes,w
and, "How to keep your health when you have so much to
do at home and at school."
The girls of "A* school are,
in these instances, the most heavily burdened.
Problems of recreation.
The recreation problems
are not centered around one special interest.
cover a wide area, including need of:
They
leisure time,
money, personal interest, parental interest, social
approval of girls enjoying boys* activities, and suita­
ble places for recreation.
The first three statements in Table T7f the most
common problems, and Table XVI, the most serious ones,
are the same.
The first statement,"How to get your
school work done and still have time for recreation,*’ is
reported by 45.3 per cent of the girls, and has also re­
ceived the high score of 311 points.
As has already been
indicated in other tables, the home work is a burden to
many.
The second and third problems, scoring closely
together, deal with money situations.
Recreation super­
visors should note these conditions, and endeavor to
remedy them through providing free or inexpensive fa­
cilities for young people’s recreation.
In doing so,
TABLE
M
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS OE RECREATION
Rank
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking hy
school
A
B. C
15i
45.3
52
59
41
125
37.3
25
50
50
113
33.7
30
46
37
103
30.7
23
46
34
,99
29.5
19
39
41
85
25.3
30
29
26
8
How to get your school work done and
still have time for recreation.
How to have enough money for school and
recreation, too.
How to get enough money to join friends in
recreation.
How to be considered a lady and yet enjoy
the games which boys play.
How to get parents to agree with you on the
hours you should com home in the evening.
How to keep up with all of the senior
activities.
How to find suitable places for a high
school girl to go in the evening.
How to act when you go to nice places.
79
77
23.5
22.9
21
17
28
33
30
27
9
How to get better recreation places in the city. 76
22.6
13
33
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
4
10
How to.use your spare time.
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
71
.21.1
14. .34 .23.
69
TABLE
XVT
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS OF RECREATION
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to get your school work done and
still have t3me for recreation*
311
How to have enough money for school
and recreation, too*
231
How to get enough money to join friends
in recreation.
177
How to get parents to agree with you on
the hours you should come home in the
evenings•
153
How to be considered a lady and yet enjoy
the games which boys play.
140
How to get better recreation places in
the city.
130
How to keep up with all of the senior
activities
129
8
How to act when you go to nice places.
118
9
How to find suitable places for a high
school girl to go in the evening.
108
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
Score of
statement
How to have time for recreation when you
will be working your way through
university.
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
94
70
the annoyance of getting better recreation places in
the city would also be relieved.
The school has put
forth an effort in this direction, as is seen in the
statement, "How to keep up with all of the senior activ­
ities;" but the problem indicates that these activities
must be too costly for a large number of girls.
"How to be considered a lady and yet enjoy the
games which boys play," may be a serious problem to
high school girls; but with the passing of adolescence,
this problem will have been replaced by new interests
which will counterbalance it.
"How to act when you go to nice places," can
easily be handled through classroom instruction.
A number of problems show, by their rankings,
considerable differences within the three schools.
The
girls of "C" school are not so worried about getting
school work done and thereby having more time for recre­
ation.
The girls of "A" school apparently have more
money to spend for school and recreation, agree in a
larger per cent with their parents on the hours they
should come home in the evening, and are not so inter­
ested in getting better recreation places in the city.
The outstanding problem in "B" school, as compared to
the other two schools is, "How to be considered a lady;/
71
and yet enjoy the games which hoys play*®
Problems concerning money.
It is interesting to
note that all statements in Tablex XVII and XVIII are
the same.
They are arranged, with the exception of the
first two, in a slightly different order.
The first problem, "How to have as much spending
money as other girls seem to have,® is a problem of 40.8
per cent of the girls; and has a high score of £36
points.
By teaching, "How to save your money," and, "How
to keep from spending your money foolishly," along with
an appreciation of the cost of living and a wholesome
attitude toward such, the pressure on the girls who
havenft as much to spend would be relieved.
Looking at
the money situation objectively, and learning to live econ~
omically, should aid in, "How to help your parents when
they are in financial difficulties," and, "How to get
your parents to realize how much spending money it takes
for everyday expenses."
The expenses of the senior year burden 40.5 per
cent of the girls;
of 225 points.
the statement received a high score
It is possible that those in charge of
these activities are unaware of this condition.
A study
of the expenses should be made in an effort to lower them*
"How to get money enough to go to college," is a
problem of 28*6 per cent of the girls.
This discloses a
TABU!
XVII
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS CONCERNING MONEY
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A
B
C
137
40.8
32
56
49
136
40.5
34
54
48
119
35.5
36
42
41
116
112
34.6
33.4
32
43
42
34
42
35
106
31.6
23
46
37
105
96
31.3 .
28.6
24
40
53
24
28
32
96
28.6
23
33
40
90
26.8
27
27
36
How to have as much spending money as
other girls seem to have.
How to meet the expenses of the senior
year.
How to keep from spending your money
foolishly.
How to keep school affairs from requiring
so much money.
How to save your money.
How to help your parents when they are in
financial difficulties.
How to decline an invitation gracefully when
you haven’t the money to go.
How to get enough money to go to college#
How to have enough money to keep up with
your friends.
How to get your parents to realize how much
money it takes for every da# expenses.
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335,
73
TABUS
XVIII
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS CONCERNING MONET
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to have as much spending money
as other girls seem to have*
236
2
How to meet the expenses of the senior
year •
225
3
How to save your money*
179
4
How to keep school affairs from requiring
so much money*
177
How to keep from spending your money
foolishly.
178
6
How to get enough money to go to college*
168
7
How to decline an invitation gracefully
when you haven*t the money to go.
159
How to have enough money to keep up with
your friends.
158
How to help your parents when they are in
financial difficulties*
153
How to get your parents to realize how
much money it takes for everyday
expenses.
141
5
8
9
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
74
need for some type of organization in the school where­
by these girls could help themselves when their parents
are unable to do so#
Money problems were not the same in the three
schools.
Not as many in "A" school were troubled about
having "as much spending money as other girls seem to
have," helping their parents out of financial difficulties,
nor declining an invitation because of the lack of money
to go; but they were more concerned than those of the
other schools in knowing how to save money, and getting
enough to go to college.
More girls in "B" school
reported the first three problems mentioned above than
in "C" school.
Problems concerning clothes.
There are two main
interests concerning clothes, as expressed in Table XIX,
the most common problems, and Table XX, the most serious
ones.
These have to do with the question of money to buy
clothes, and the details of how to wear them becomingly*
Number 9, in Table XIX, is the only problem not
included in Table XX.
"How to dress when you are going
out with a boy," is expected to be a problem, but not a
serious one.
Number 9, in Table XX, "How to know the
colors which make you the most attractive," would apply
to more girls than the former one, as there are a number
of girls, according to the "problemsire," who do not
TABLE
XIX
THE TEN MOST COMMON PROBLEMS CONCERNING CLOTHES
Rank
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
1
How to have new clothes more often*
150
44.7
43
54
53
2
3
How to know what to wear on different
occasions.
How to dress to suit your personality.
189
180
38.5
35.8
41
36
53
45
35
39
4
How to know when to wear a hat.
120
35.8
37
50
33
5
114
34.0
37
43
34
7
How to dress nicely without depriving the ;
family.
How to feel well dressed with an ordinary
amount of clothes.
gow to know the best way to wear clothes.
107
107
31.9
3199
33
31
42
41
32
35
8
How to dress nicely but inexpensively.
98
29.2
27
39
32
9
How to dress when you are going out with
a boy.
How to know the colors which make you the
most attractive.
94
28.0
24
49
21
93
27.7
26
36
31
6
10
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
76
fABLE
XX
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS PROBLEMS CONCERNING CLOTHES
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How to have new clothes more often*
247
a
How to know what to wear on different
occasions*
240
3
How to dress nicely but inexpensively*
171
4
How to dress to suit your personality.
166
5
How to know when to wear a hat.
162
6
How to dress nicely without depriving
the family*
159
How to feel well dressed with an ordinary
amount of clothes.
147
8
How to know the best way to wear clothes .
127
9
How to know the colors which make you
the most attractive.
119
How to attend partiesswithout feeling
inferior to the girls who have nicer
clothes.
115
7
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
77
keep company with boys, as yet.
The problems listed in these tables are of an
impersonal nature.
Their solution should offer pleasur­
able instruction in the classroom, as the subject of
clothes has a high rate of Interest to girls.
Those
problems having to do with lack of money to buy nice
clothes can in part be helped through instruction in
wise, economical buying; and in teaching the girls
that being well-dressed is not entirely a matter of
money*
This information is opportune, considering that
six of the ten problems in Table XIX, and five, in Table
XX, have to do with knowing how to wear clothes correctly
and effectively.
The differences in ranking of problems are not
as great as in former tables.
In the three problems of
the most noticeable ones, the girls of "B" school have
the highest scores, the girls of "A* school next, and the
girls of "C* school, the least.
These problems are:
"How to know what to wear on different occasions," "How
to know when to wear a hat," and, "How to dress when you
are going out with a boy."
Miscellaneous problems.
The problems of Tables
XXJ the most common miscellaneous problems, and XXIJ,
the most serious miscellaneous problems, are the same,
although they are arranged in a different order»
TABLE) XXJ
THE ,TEN MOST COMMON MISCELLANEOUS PROBLEMS
Rank
Statement of problem
Number of
girls
reporting
Per
cent
Ranking by
school
A B C
1
How to learn to be charming.
177
52.8
62
59
56
2
How to get over being self-conscious*
171
510
50
64
57
3
How to have a nice personality.
160
47.7
56
58
46
4
How to keep from being moody.
150
44.7
46
50
54
5
How to develop confidence.
142
42.3
52
50
40
6
How to keep from day dreaming*
142
42*3
53
41
48
7
How to control your temper.
141
42.0
40
47
54
8
How to keep your mind away from your troubles.
133
39.7
.45
52
36
9
How to overcome blushing.
119
35*5
23
51
45
10
How to keep from.being irritable.
. 116
34.6
45
33
38
Total number reporting these problems most common— 335.
79
TABLE
XXII
THE TEN MOST SERIOUS MISCELLANEOUS PROBLEMS
Rank
Statement of problem
1
How
to keep from being moody.
500
2
How
to have a nice personality.
278
3
How
to learn to be charming.
270
4
How
to get over being self-conscious.
244
5
How
to control your temper.
232
6
How
to develop confidence.
208
7
How
to keep from day dreaming.
195
8
How
to Overcome blushing.
191
9
How to keep your mind away from your
troubles.
180
How to keep from being irritable.
145
10
Score of
statement
Total number reporting these problems most serious— 330
80
All statements, in both tables, received high
scores; the highest in the most common ones being
52.8 per cent, and the lowest, 34.6 per cent.
The
range of the most serious ones was great, being 155 points.
The problems listed are not of a surprising nature,
but are those which are to be expected from matureminded girls.
More than half of the annoyances are of
an emotional nature.
Such difficulties ass
"How to
keep from being moody," "How to get over being selfconscious," "How to control your temper,”
"How to
develop confidence," "How to keep from daydreaming,"
"How to keep your mind away from your troubles," and,
"How to keep from being irritable," are disturbances
which have been cheeked early in school life.
These problems are difficult to handle as the
sources leading to such troubles are puzzling; they
may arise from any of the problems included in the other
sections, or be a combination of difficulties over
several sections.
For example, the hindrance of being
irritable is a symptom of other disturbances, the de­
tection of which would be hard to determine.
"How to
learn to be charming," and, "How to have a nice person­
ality," are easier to handle, as the direct method of
teaching subject matter alleviates them.
81
The solution or correction of problems in the
other sections would automatically reduce the anxiety
expressed in the statements of the miscellaneous problems*
The differences ©re not great in "Ranking by
schools"
The most striking is that of knowing how to
develop confidence, in which the girls of "C" school
worried less than the others; as was also the case in
the problem of keeping their minds away from their
troubles*
The girls of "B" school were much more con­
cerned about the embarrassment of blushing; and the girls
of "A" school were the most troubled about being irritable*
Additional problems*
Despite the fact that there
were overlappings in the "problemsire," the effect of
which was expected to be more complete recognition of
problems, there were a number of difficulties expressed
on the extra sheet at the end which had already been
included in the "problemsire;* the only difference ex­
isting in a slight change of wording*
It was thought,
by the investigator, that these disturbances were of
sufficient annoyance to those responding to have caused
them to repeat for emphasis*
The problems listed which :had not been covered in
the "problemsire" are stated here for comparison*
are as follows:
They
82
"An school:
How to get your parents to let you sleep in the
morning when you*ve been out late the night before.
Should engagements be announced during the senior
year, or even at graduation?
How to keep one boy out of your mind.
How to have separate biology classes, boys from
girls.
How to know what to do if my aunt died, and I were
left alone.
"B* school:
How to decide if you love someone; and what is love?
Should you refuse dates with other girls* boy
fr iends?
How to show your parents you think of them, and
would do anything for them.
How to get boys and girls to aet decently in
church, and not make a lot of noise unnecessarily.
How to overcome procrastination.
How to keep from being over-generous.
How to have training in regard to sex problems.
Should a girl be engaged while still going to
high school?
How much money should be had before marriage?
Should there be a large number of years between
the ages of girls and boys, for successful marriages?
How often should you see a steady boy friend or
the boy you are engaged to?
Should boys and girls hold hands?
How to get enough money to start a home.
*0* school:
How to take care of the family when you are the
oldest and your mother is dead.
How to keep your folks from thinking an innocent
good-night kiss is bad, and not done by good girls.
Why can a girl go to school for three years and
never have a date, then change schools and never have
to worry about dates, end then go back to the first
school and again never have a date?
In analyzing these problems it is found that
out of the twenty-one indicated there ere thirteen be­
longing to the section of boy and girl relationships,
four to home life, one to school life, one to religion,
and two to miscellaneous.
Of the thirteen relating to
boy and girl relationships six pertain to questions of
marriage.
These results give additional importance to
the section of boy and girl relationships, with an em­
phasis on the felt need of education for marriage.
The
type of problem in the additional list is much the same
as that of the sections of the wproblemaire;" and the
same methods used to appease the problems of the section
would alleviate the additional ones.
Areas of greatest number of problems.
According
to the results shown in the tables of the most common
problems, the greatest number of disturbances exist in
the areas of school life, boy and girl relationships,
vocation, and home life.
This conclusion was reached
by finding the sections in which problems had been re­
ported by the largest number of girls, comparing the range
from the highest to the lowest problem, counting the number
of problems in the section, and considering the additional
ones reported at the end of the "problemsire."
Two sections of the "problemsire" were found to
84
be of almost equal importance:
and girl relationships*
school life, and boy
There were thirty-eight prob­
lems listed in the latter section, with thirteen addition­
al ones at the end of the "problemsire*"
Together, the
fifty-one problems made a total of twenty-two more than
in school life*
The range of school life was from 67.1
per cent to 47*1 per cent, a difference of 20*0 points*
The range of boy and girl relationships was from 61*1
per cent to 40*2 per cent, a degree of 20*9 points*
Although the division of boy and girl relationships had
more problems listed, those at the end of the "problemsire"
were reported by one girl each which lessened the differ­
ence between sections*
The highest ranking problem in
the section of school life was reported by twenty more
girls than that of boy and girl relationships, and the
lowest ranking problem was reported by twenty-three more
girls than in the latter section*
The area of school
life, therefore, had the greatest number of problems,
with that of boy and girl relationships being almost the
same*
The section of vocation ranked next, with a close
relati&nahlp to the above sections in the number of
problems*
The percentage of girls reporting the state­
ments to be problems ranged from 61*1 per cent to 44.4
85
per cent, a difference of 16*7 points#
While the
range was greater in the division of boy and girl re­
lationships , the number of problems showed such a wide
difference that the section of vocation ranked third;
vocation included twenty problems, boy and girl rela­
tionships, fifty-one#
The section ranking fourth was that of home life,
with thirty-three statements in the "problemsire,” and
four listed at the end#
The per cent of girls report­
ing problems was from 54.3 to 29*5 per cent, a differ­
ence of 24#8 points#
This percentage was noticeably be­
low that of the first three sections discussed.
The miscellaneous section of problems was fifth
in number of problems reported.
The range was from 52#8
per cent to 34#6 per cent, making a difference of 18#Z
points.
Thirteen problems were listed#
Closely related
to this section was that of friends which rated sixth
due to the range in percentage; being from 52#2 per cent
to 30#7 per cent, a degree of 21#5 points#
There were
twenty-one problems in the "problemaire#*
The other sections of the "problemsire" rank
close to the last
'two sections discussed, in the number
of problems reported; all are fairly high#
The most serious problems,
The only method of
discerning the problems of the most serious nature to
the girls was by comparing the scores of the state­
ments , and the range of these scores, in the tables
of the "problemaire,”
According to this method it
was found that the greatest of the difficulties existed
in the areas of boy and girl relationships, vocation,
school life, and miscellaneous problems.
The division
of boy and girl relationships Indicated scores from 336
to 169, revealing a difference of 167 points.
The problems
of vocation received scores from 339 to 196, having a
range of 133 points.
The scores of school life ranged
from 317 to 316, showing a spread of 101 points.
Mis­
cellaneous problems indicated a spread of 155, being from
300 to 145,
311 to 94,
ence of 146*
The range of recreation was 217, scoring from
Home life ranged from 294 to 148, a differ­
Such figures as these show a serious need
for more guidance.
The other tables, ranking below the ones mentioned
above, show wide ranges in scores; the most marked being
in the section of health; here there existed a span of
261 points, ranging from 502 to 41,
Where there are such
differences between the highest and the lowest scores, the
fact is apparent that not all of the statements of the
section are vital problems to the girls.
87
Two significant facts signify a close relationship
between the most serious problems and those most common:
the three sections receiving the highest scores of the
serious problems are the same as those of the common
problems; the same three sections, in both types of
tables, are also so closely related in their rankings
that the lines of demarcation are difficult to make*
Outstanding problems*
The most outstanding
problems would necessarily be judged according to the per­
centage of girls reporting them as annoyances, as indica­
ted in the tables of the most common problems9 and accord­
ing to their degree of seriousness as disclosed by the
scores in the tables of those most serious*
Due to
limited space, only the five most outstanding disturbances
of both types will be mentioned here*
The five most
common will be discussed first*
The highest ranking three of those most frequently
reported are found in the field of school life*
The one
ranking first was a problem to 67.1 per cent, "How to
become interested in subjects you don’t like*"
Here a
need is seen of a change in the procedure of presenting
subject materials; or the statement may indicate that
the girls are taking subjects for which they have no
special use.
"How to get more experience in appearing
before people,n was marked by 64.7 per cent, making
it rank second.
More training in the proceding grades
would alleviate this condition which is puxgling to so
many girls.
"How to concentrate," by 62.9 per cent,
ranked third.
Considerable attention should be given t©
the development of this
habit in the lower grades, and
the effort made to inhibit daydreaming.
The fourth
problem occurred in the area of boy and girl relationships
"How to meet boys you would like to know," by 61.1 per
cent.
This disclosure should be a valuable discovery
to high school counselors toward guiding the social activ­
ities.
Suitable methods of getting young people e'.j :i
acquainted might avoid such as public dance hall catas­
trophes, later.
The fifth problem was one of vocation,
"How to know which jobs are open to high school graduates,
a question to 61.1 per cent.
While annoying, it is of
minor significance when compared to problems involving
a change of attitudes and ideals.
The imparting of this
information is practically all that is needed toward the
solution of this problem.
The outstanding problems among those designated
as most serious are found in the sections pertaining
to boy and girl relationships, vocation, and school life.
89
The first belongs to boy and girl relationships, "How to
plan for marriage and a career, too," having a score of
336.
Attaining a satisfactory solution to this question
is difficult as it is an unsolved problem, even to society*
The second problem concerned vocation, "How to know what
jobs are open to high school graduates," and scores 329
points*
This statement was fifth among the outstanding
common problems*
The third is one of school life, "How
to get more experience in appearing before people,"
scoring 31?, and was also listed among the five most
common problems*
The fourth is again one of vocation,
"How to choose a vocation to suit you," by 314, and in­
volves individual guidance, as mentioned in the previous
discussion of tables.
The fifth refers again to school
life, "How to concentrate," with a score of 312.
It was
another problem of the group of the five most common
problems*
Problems not in tables*
There are a number of
difficulties of considerable importance expressed in the
sections of the "problemsire" which received high scores,
but were not included in the tables, due to the extra
bulk of the material*
Those not contained in tables,
throughout the sections, are much the same as the first
90
ten most common and most serious.
The methods of pro­
cedure applicable to the problems in the tables would,
therefore, alleviate the remaining ones.
As an example,
remedying, "How to get your home work done without staying
up too late at night," would help solves, "How to study
with the radio."
Finding the answer to, "How to become
interested in subjects you don’t like," would be the reply
to, "How to get any good out of the courses you are taking."
In many of the problems, not included in the tables,
there are conditions expressed which the girls would be
glad to acknowledge as their personal difficulties, and
thereby receive the individual guidance needed, as in,
"How to decide whether to go to college or to find a job."
This would also be true of problems in the tables.
In several of the sections of the "problemsire"
there are statements which have received almost the same
scores as these included in the tables.
For instance,
the tenth statement in Table H I of the most common prob­
lems of home life has a score of ninety-nine, while the
eleventh problem received a score of ninety-eight, but is
equally as important in nature, being, "How to sit down
with your mother and talk over your problems with her."
Taking this fact into consideration, it would be wise for
anyone using this
type of study for reference in guidance
91
work, to examine also the problems not in tables.
There are a number of serious problems which,
fortunately, do not represent difficulties to a great
many, and therefore are not listed among those in the
tables.
Two of such problems will serve as examples:
"How to make your father realize the harm he is doing
to the family when he drinks," and, "How to keep the
friendship of a boy without drinking or necking."
Though a few in number, the girls having these diffi­
culties are in more need of help than large numbers
of girls with problems requiring only information as
the answers.
Ten problems chosen from each section represents
only a meager sampling of several sections.
In the
division of boy and girl relationships, for instance,
there are fifty-one statements, including those at the
end of the "problemsire," practically all of which
received high scores.
Hot all problems listed, however,
©re of a serious nature.
The problems of school life, not included in
tables, center basically around questions of success
in the classroom.
Several of these statements scored
just below the tenth problem.
The problems of h&me life mostly pertain to the
98
question of getting along with parents.
Less than one-
third of these problems eould be listed in tables, due
to the fact that there were thirty-three statements in
the section of the "problemsiren with four at the end.
All of the problems of evocation are of a serious
nature, including those in tables.
They show, on the
whole, a feeling of indefiniteness, and lack of security.
Only one problem in the entire section was reported by
less than one-hundred girls.
On the whole, the difficulties concerning friends
were of an impersonal nature, the same as those of the
tables.
Two problems, however, should be given at­
tention, regardless of the samll number reporting them,
"How to keep out of bad company," and, "How to know if
you should drink and smoke to make friends."
was marked by forty-five girls;
The first
the secon, by thirty-
seven.
Most of the statements in the section of religion
were included in the tables; the others would be even
more difficult to solve in the classroom;
the only
help being through indirect methods as suggested in the
discussion of tables.
The problems of health, without exception, are those
of girls with poor health, as seen in, "How to plan your
future when you have poor health."
It is encouraging to
93
know that a check on health records would find the girls
who need this help, and individual guidance could then be
given accordingly*
The scores in the section on recreation are
comparatively low.
The nature of the statements do not
reveal any particular anxiety.
They are such as, "How
to find the best places in the city for recreation."
The tables of problems concerning money have
included almost all of the problems of the section. Those
remaining are such as would be expected of the average
girl, "How to come to an agreement with your parents on
an allowance."
The same methods of adjustment would
apply to all problems in this section.
Practically all of the problems in the section
concerning clothes have been included in the tables.
Those remaining are the same type of difficulty and,
therefore, could be handled together with those in the
tables.
Special comparisons.
In each of the eleven sec­
tions of the "problemaire" there are problems whose
trends are found in other sections.
In making the com­
parisons, only one example from each section will be cited.
Hie need of financial aid expressed In the division
of school life, "How to work your way through the univer­
sity," is found in that of vocation,"How to find work
94
which will make it possible to ge through college.” ' The
feeling of anxiety, found among those of school life, "How
to keep from worrying about your studies," is also present
among the miscellaneous, "How to keep your mind away from
your troubles."
An expression of lack of confidence is
seen in the statement of school life, "How to get more
experience in appearing before people," which is also in
the division of vocation,"How to overcome timidity so it
wonft be a hindrance to your vocation."
A desire for more
freedom and independence is sought in the section of home
life, "How to have more freedom to come and go," in boy
and girl relationships, "How to keep from having trouble
with your parents over dates," and in vocation, "How to
convince your parents that you want to choose your own
vocation."
The annoyance of being self-conscious is ex­
pressed among the problems concerning friends, "How to
overcome shyness when with friends," and is present in
the miscellaneous group, "How to keep from being easily
embarrassed."
A longing for harmony among the members
of the family exists in the sections of religion and
home life, "How to have more religion in the home," and,
"How to keep quarreling out of the home."
Indecision is
expressed in the divisions of religion, vocation, and
school life:
"How to know what you should really believe,"
95
"How to determine before entering college what you would
really like to be,” and, "How to deeide whether to go to
college or to find a job*"
Concern over too much school
work to be done at home is found in the problems of health,
school life, and in recreation, "How to do your home work
without weakening your eyes," "How to get your home work
done without staying up too late at night," and, "How to
get your school work done and still have time for recrea­
tion."
Social approval is considered to be indispensable,
as seen in problems of recreation, clothes, and miscellan­
eous}
"How to act when you go to nice places," "How to
know what to wear on different occasions," and, "How to
learn to be charming*"
Not all comparisons and examples could be cited
or quoted here, but those chosen are representative of
the "problemsire" as a whole*
CHAPTER
V
AN ANALYSIS OF GUIDANCE METHODS REPORTED BY COUNSELORS
This chapter presents a discussion of the procedure
in determining the guidance methods used in the schools
studied to meet the personal problems, the presentation
and discussion of the findings, an evaluation of the
methods as disclosed by the results of the "problemsire,"
and an analysis of the problems which are considered to be
the result of the economic status of the respective build­
ings.
Inasmuch as some problems were largely caused by
the environment of the community in which the school is
located, rather than through an inadequacy of the guidance
methods used in the building, the analysis of the problems
presumably influenced by the economic status will be dis­
cussed together with the evaluation of methods used in the
respective schools.
Technique.
To ascertain the effectiveness of the
guidance methods used to meet the girlsf personal problems,
a method was sought whereby the specific procedure used
for each division of the "problemsire* could be determined,
and not Just guidance methods in general.
The knowledge
of all methods used in the building, toward the relief of
97
the girls* problems, was desired, regardless of how, or by
whom, such was managed.
Before beginning the procedure
the oonsent of the respective counselors to co-operate
in this study was obtained.
An outline of the areas in­
cluded in the "problemsire" was therefore prepared, with
space provided for the listing of the methods.
The in­
structions requested that the counselors list the methods
used, in each division, to meet the girls?* problems.
One
was taken to each of the three schools, together with
the "problems ires j" to -/be completed during the time the
"problemsires" were being administered in the respective
buildings.
When the forms had been completed, arid were again
in the hands of the investigator, a study was made of the
replies which had been mostly made in outline form.
hering closely to the wording and
Ad­
methods of response
which had been used by the counselors, the information
was consolidated into one outline.
The finished form has
been included in this chapter for purposes of reference
and comparison.
A copy of the form sent to the counselors
is included in the Appendix.
Comparison of methods within schools.
Definite,
accurate decisions of the degree of likeness or difference
of the methods are difficult to make due to the brevity
98
METHODS USED IN EACH SCHOOL TO MEET THE GIRLS* PROBLEMS
AS STATED BY THE COUNSELORS
I«
School
A. School life
1. Girls* League work
a.
For
girlstowork with one another
h.
For
girlstowork for school
2. Clubs
a.
For
girlstowork with one another
b#
For
girlstowork for the school
3* Interview with the dean of girls
a* Concerning program of studies
4. Interview with teachers
a. On subjects being studied in the classrooms
B. Home Life
1# Indirect help in various ways
C. Boy and girl relationships
1* Opportunities for normal companionship and fun
a* Five or six evening dances
1* Carefully supervised
2. Social occasions
a* Arranged by school clubs
3* Occasional talks to students
a* Made by "Tri Y* and **Hi Y w school clubs
4. Efforts toward finest type of everyday living
99
a. Talks in physical education classes
b* Talks in sociology classes
D* Vocation
1* Course in vocational English
£« Talks to students
a* Given in League meetings
3* Annual "Vocational Bay"
a. Visits to the school byprominent men
1* Choice of group interviewgiven
and women
to each
child
b* Work in senior English classes
c* Work in vocational courses
E* Friends
1. Opportunities for girls to work together
a* Big sister for each girl
b* Gymnasium facilities
c. Classroom work
d* Club work
e. Girls* League
1. Committee work to further friendship work
F. Religion
1* Effort to live on highest plane possible
a* Assembly programs*
1. Requirement of good music and fine enter­
tainment
100
G» Health
1* Yearly examination by school doctor
2* Notes or personal calls to families
a. To settle troubles
3. Restricted or nrest gym"
a« For those not able to take regular work
1.
Oases checked on late in school year
b« Health information
1« Recorded in girls9, folders
4* Talks to students
a. Given in physical education classes
1* As a guide in school activities
H* Recreation
1* Physical education program
a. One hour a day
2* School clubs
3* After-school sports
I* Money
1. N.Y.A* jobs
2. Positions secured through office of dean of girls
3# Assistance to girls in most need
a. Necessities provided through P.T.A.
1* Money given to dean of girls for such
purposes
101
I. Clothes
1. Uniforms required
a. To encourage simplicity in dress
2. Annual talk
a. On subject of, "Good Taste in Dress*
1. Given by a leading department store
K. Miscellaneous
(None given)
II. "B" School
A. School life
1. A study of the school manual
2. "Hello Day"
3. Stress on proper attitude
B. Home Life
1. Unit on family relations
a. Obligations
*of-
each member of the family
b. Home makers
c. Home visits
d. Interviews with parents
2. Stress on proper attitude
C. Boy and girl relationships
1« Unit on social arts
8. Good manners
b. Stress wholesome attitude toward sex
c. Encourage girls to have friends of opposite
sex
102
2.
Personal interviews
3* Stress on proper attitude
D« Vocation
1* Unit on, "What about job?*
a* Vocational guidance lectures
1* Personnel director
B* Job Placement Bureau
3« College deans
b* Stress on the need of personality in business
1* How to get the job
2* How to keep the job
2* Job Placement Bureau
II. Friends
1* Unit on personality
a* How to be a friend
b« How to like people
e* How to smile easily
d* How to overlook the peculiarities of others
2* Personality tests
F* Religion
1* Stress the need for spiritual as well as
physical and mental development
2* Stress the need for tolerance
C» Health
!• Stress on the need of health
103
S« Talk oby the school nurse
3, Physical education
H. Recreation
1* Unit on leisure time
a. Contrast past and present
b. Wholesome recreation
c» Class parties and social functions
I. Money
1* Unit on, "What about dollars?"
a. Study consumer education
b, Study personal budgets
c* Study spending money
2. N.Y.A*
Clothes
1. Unit on social arts— dress and personality
a* Displays from leading stores in the community
b. Styles shows
o* fveryday illustrations
£• Miscellaneous
1. Individual interviews on personal problems
III, "C" School
A*
School life
1, Units in core classes
104
B« Home life
1* Close contact with counseling officer and
attendance co-ordinations
C* Boy and girl relationships
1. Individual conferences
2. Group guidance
B. Vocation
1. Special employment service
a. Handled in Vice Principals office
1. Friends
1. Individual guidance
2. Activity program
3. "Tri Y n and academic clubs
F* Religion
1* Individual counseling
G. Health
1. Counseling office
a. Co-operating with physical education,
and school nursefs office
H* Recreation
1* Group and club guidance
I. Money
1. Student loan fundc aids
a. Handled through Vice Principals office
J. Clothes
1. P.T.A* co-operation
105
2.
Student Aid Fund
K. Miscellaneous
(None given)
Note:
"For the most part all these problems are taken
care of through the core and girl problem classes,
and individual counseling.
Cur offices try to
meet with each girl at some time.
T
The objective of our counseling service is to
meet individual needs in every way possible.
Much of the *more than we can do* type of problem
has been referred and cared for by individual
faculty members, core teachers, etc.1*
106
and lack of detail of the responses
received*
While the
general nature of the methods used is possible to deter­
mine, yet lack of completeness in their indication'
make the implications of a less certain nature.
The
manner of coping with the problems within the three
schools is closely releted, but the approach in several
of the sections is not the same*
For example, a direct
method may be used by one of the schools while the other
two employ indirect methods*
The extent to which the
schools endeavor to meet the girls1 problems does not
differ to a marked degree as each of them have both elab­
orate lists and practically neglected ones within the
sections*
The technique of meeting the school problems by
the three schools is somewhat closely related.
In
general, It consists of getting the students acquainted
with one another, and insuring their interests.in school
which includes individual guidance concerning classroom
subjects and program of studies*
In "B" school, a stress
on the proper attitude is listed, as it is in several
other sections; but how such training takes place is not
stated.
It is assumed that "stress on the proper atti­
tudes" refers to the attempt to instill worthy ideals
and attitudes whenever contact is made with the girls#
In "C" school, the units in core classes is the only
107
method listed*
A note at the end of the outline states to
the effect that practically all problems are taken care
of through core and girl problem classes, and when neces­
sary, by the faculty members.
A noticeable difference exists among the schools in
the meeting of problems of home life.
The only comment in
"A” school is, "Indirect help in various ways."
The manner
in nB" school is a direct one, that of working through a
unit on family relations which includes necessary contacts
with the home, and stressing the proper attitude.
In "C"
school, the help is again done indirectly, the counselor
and the attendance co-ordinations having the responsibility.
A more detailed system toward adjustment is seen in
the section of boy and girl relationships, particularly in
"A" and "B" schools.
Numerous social activities are
sponsored in "A" school, with talks to the students in the
classroom and organization meetings.
activity.
The stress here is on
In *B" school the approach is mostly through
instruction in the unit on social arts, with philosophical
emphasis on wholesome and proper attitudes; and personal
interviews when necessary.
Those of "G" school are in­
direct, consisting of individual conferences and group
guidance; although the note at the end of the outline
indicates that classroom instruction also plays a part.
The predominant method in preparing the girls
& 08
vocationally is that of classroom instruction*
the
In addition,
school conducts talks to students in the League
meetings, and arranges for outside authorities to visit
the building and. help them*
The instruction in "B"
building includes lectures, and a particular emphasis
upon the need of personality in getting and keeping the
job.
The major method as listed in "C" building is in
the special employment service; the core and girl problem
classes handles the instruction*
In meeting the problems concerning friends the
schools each employ a different philosopny.
The nA n
building is one of activities to get the girls acquainted,
centering in organization work*
The methods are much the
same as those in the section of school life.
In nBn
school, personality is the main avenue through which the
training takes place, supplemented by personality tests.
The HC n school endeavors to handle the situation through
personal contact, the girls1 activities, and school clubs.
The approach to correcting religious difficulties
widely differs within the schools.
In "A" school it is
an indirect method, consisting of attaining high standards
through the best entertainment.
A more direct approa ch is
made in nB* school, emphasizing spiritual development
along with the mental and physical, and stressing the need
for tolerance.
The sole method listed in nC n school is
109
that of counseling, done individually*
The most detailed efforts toward the solution of
health problems are in WAW building, with individual
attention predominant as evidenced by physical examina­
tions, contact with the home when necessary, health records,
and group instructions*
Classroom instruction and physical
education activities suffice in "Bw building*
The counsel­
ing office assumes the responsibility in nGn school, con­
tacting the physical education department and the school
nurseis office for those in need*
Recreation problems are approached from different
angles*
In "A* school it is an activity program ex­
clusively, giving the girls opportunity to enjoy an hour
of physical education activity, daily;
and participate
in further recreation through school clubs and afterschool sports*
Classroom procedure and social functions
are designated to be the methods of
school;
while
n0m school meets the problems through group and club
guidance*
In general, the problems concerning money are man­
aged by means of personal assistance*
This is the case
in "A” school, and, additionally, through the provision
of jobs; in nB ” school, through classroom study of money
problems, and the facilities of the N*Y*A* for those in
need; and in "C* school, by the Student Loan Fund aids*
110
Methods dealing with the difficulties concerning
clothes differ considerably within the schools.
Uniforms
in ”A ” school are intended to meet the problems;
while
instruction by a department store constitutes the train­
ing.
More importance is given to the division of clothes
in ”B” school.
A unit on social arts, including displays
from stores, and instruction in the relationship of dress
to personality is conducted for the alleviation of problems.
*
\
■
The method in n0 n school consists of aiding the girls in
financial distress.
Core and girl problem classes probably
have a part in this.
In two of the three schools there are no comments
listed under the miscellaneous section.
"A” and "0” schools.
These are the
Those of the ”B” school are handled
through individual interviews.
Comparison of methods with findinggs of "problemaire.*
In all problems of school life the percentage of girls
reporting problems is high, as are the scores.
dition exists in all three schools.
This con­
The girls of ”B ”
school, according to "Ranking by school,” felt the most
heavily burdened by the assignments to be done at home.
The ”A ” school is the only one mentioning individual help
in the program of studies and subjects being studied in
the classroom.
The problems in the tables are of a
Ill
different nature than those which would he covered by the
methods listed within the schools.
The school load, a
lack of satisfaction in the subjects being studied, and a
lack of confidence to express one’s self, are the trends
of the problems of this section, according to the tables*
The same burden of school work to be done at home is
found in the problems of home life, with "B" school again
having the heaviest load.
It is impossible to determine
the exact methods used to lighten the troubles of home
life in "A" school, the only statement being, "Indirect
help in various ways."
The unit on family relations in
"B" school may have been responsible for the girls* especial
desire to please their parents, as the numbers show that
they were the most anxious to show their appreciation.
The girls of nC* school were considerably less interested
in showing appreciation than were the girls of the other
two schools;
they were also less interested in having
a greater amount of companionship with their parents.
The
combination of these two problems seem, to the investigator,
to be the result of economic status rather than of school
methods, probably indicating that the "C" girls felt less
confidence in their parents, and that they hadn’t an abun­
dance for which to be thankful.
Making the methods more
personal in dealing with problems of home life should aid
toward the solution of several of them;
yet, the content
112
of the listed difficulties reveal a need of more contact
by the school, with the home*
The percentages and scores are high in the division
of boy and girl relationships.
As has been explained be­
fore as a credit to the counselors, the problems of a
serious nature are few.
The "G* school had noticeably
less problems in several instances than "A" and "Bw schools.
According to the outline, the methods of wA tt and nBn schools
should be equally as effective in handling the problems as
those of ”C n school.
The difference, therefore, would
probably be due to the dissimilarity of the communities of
the schools.
More girls in nA n school not being able to
get dates for the senior dates would indicate that aaong
these wealthier homes there is not the element of democracy
which exists in the less wealthy districts.
This same as­
sumption would apply to other responses from WC W school,
that not so many girls were worried about getting dates,
knowing how to refuse them, nor puzzled about whether or
not the boy friend is the right one to marry.
A need for
more opportunities to get boys and girls acquainted is
manifested in the problems listed in the tables.
Although
"A" school has specifically mentioned a number of social
occasions, none of the three schools have itemized ways of
getting boys and girls acquainted.
This is an outstanding
problem to an equally large number of girls in each school*
113
The various lectures, authorities, vocational
instruction, and job bureaus, have been unable to satisfy
in the minds of the girls what jobs are open to high school
graduates.
The girls of "A" school were much less inter­
ested in securing jobs than those of the other two schools,
which, doubtlessly, was due to a lack of worry over finan­
ces.
This is consistent with the problems of knowing where
to apply for a job, nA" school being noticeably less than
the others.
The stress on the need of personality in
business in **BW school may have been responsible for the
girls1 feeling of need of more poise to hold a job.
The
girls of all three buildings showed interest in vocation,
due to the study of such in the buildings, but they were
perplexed in knowing how to choose a vocation individually
suited to them.
There is no suggestion of this type of
help in the listed methods.
The methods within all three schools have been suc­
cessful in attaining harmony among the girls.
The problems
listed areootf the same wholesome nature as those of the
division of boy and girl relationships.
The girls of
"B" school, which would represent the average girls*
status, were more concerned about their social standing
than the girls of the other schools.
There were less
girls in "C" school having problems concerning friends;
114
in factt the "Hanking by school” reveals that ”C ” school
has the lowest scores in every statement in the tables
but two, "How to keep up a conversation when you meet a
new person,” and, "How to make people like you*”
Such a
situation shows the same democratic nature in this school
as is evident in the section of boy and girl relationships,
which resulted, mostly, from the environment of the school*
The fact that the scores and percentages are high in
certain problems in all three schools discloses that a
more democratic feeling should be sought.
The classroom
situation could be adjusted to handle this situation as
well as to cover the training requested by the problems
listed*
Methods to handle religious problems cannot be
severely criticized, considering that very little can be
done within the school.
school” are slight.
The differences in "Ranking by
Communities differ in their atti­
tudes toward religious training in school, some being
very prejudiced against any guidance, as was the case in
one of these schools*
It is, therefore, difficult to judge
or compare methods used in this section*
The highest
rating problem, reported by 25.9 per cent, probably does
not indicate a serious condition;
but, rather, may
indicate the girls* attempts to live up to high standards.
As has been suggested previously, a number of these
115
problems could be alleviated through work in other
sections*
The most outstanding trend of the problems con­
cerning health is the fatigue caused by a heavy burden of
school work.
Although not as many girls in "Cn school
felt the need for rest, yet the high percentage of girls
in all three buildings reporting this problem indicates a
serious need.
The amount and the type of health in­
struction these girls received was not indicated, but a
desire for personalized methods is expressed in the diffi­
culties listed.
On the whole, the health worries are not
of a serious nature;
the individual &elp given to the
girls, as revealed in the outline, probably was responsi­
ble for this encouraging condition.
However, the girls
in poor health apparently were in need of more help*
The schools* provisions of recreation were evi­
dently felt to be adequate as manifested in the type of
problem expressed by the girls.
But the desire for more
activity was stated by a large number, with the regret
by the girls in all three buildings that school work
required so much out of school time.
The economic
status of "A* school decidedly influenced the problems
of the girls;
they expressed much less concern about
having enough money to enjoy recreation and to get
better recreation places in the city, than did the girls
116
of "B" and "C* schools*
Suggestions for the relief of
these conditions have already been discussed*
Economic status played a major part in the section
of problems pertaining to money*
The financial worries
were not as significant to the girls of "A" school as they
were to those of *BW and wCn schools;
but the "A" girls
were more puzzled about saving money, and getting enough
to go to college.
It is possible that a smaller per­
centage of girls in wB n and WG* schools considered the
continuance of educational training*
However, the
methods listed in "A" school disclose the fact that there
were girls who needed financial assistance in this school,
too;
as does the number of girls reporting such problems.
Classroom procedure, not mentioned in "Aw school, might
have helped to solve the remaining ones.
The problems of
wB tt and WC M schools are closely related;
the outstanding
characteristic is the felt need of more money.
The class­
room situation and individual assistance should be able
to alleviate most of the problems;
efforts toward such
are seen in the methods listed.
The methods of the three schools to meet the diffi­
culties concerning clothes, including talks and demonstra­
tions on the correct and becoming ways of wearing them,
were of the nature most needed by the girls according to
the type of problem indicated.
The number of girls having
117
annoyances of this nature after such training divulges
that more detail is needed*
Economic status seems to
have had but one influence in regard to clothes, the
girls of "Gn school expressed less interest in the de­
tails of being well-dressed.
With the methods listed in
"A" and nB w schools it is doubtful that the n0n girls
received more training*
The problems of the miscellaneous section might
well be transferred to other divisions and be adequately
handled there*
methods listed.
It is not surprising that there were no
The only exception is one of ”B ” school,
"Individual interviews on personal problems."
Any
problems arising of a special classification probably were
handled through the counselor’s office, or referred to
the classroom.
CHAPTER
VI
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
Tlie findings, conclusions, and implications of
the study of the senior girls* personal problems are
presented in this chapter*
This material consists of
the problems of greatest significance and those of the
most serious nature as found by means of the "problemaire,"
the effectiveness of the guidance methods to meet these
problems, the influence of economic status upon the nature
of the difficulties, the extent to which the former studies
are related to the present one, and the deviation of the
problems of the senior girl from those of all adolescent
girls*
Conclusions are drawn from the results, and im­
plications determined wherein the school program may be
adjusted to meet these needs*
Summary*
The problems of greatest significance
(those reported most frequently and therefore considered
to be the most common) were found to be in the areas of
school life, boy and girl relationships, vocation, and
home life.
Those of the most serious nature (causing
the most difficulty to the girls) existed in the areas of
c,
boy and girl relationships, vocation, shool life, and
119
miscellaneous.
The most common and the most serious
problems were closely related in that the three sections
having the greatest number of problems and the three of
the most serious nature were the same;
rankings of these
divisions were so close to one another that the difference
in importance was of minor consequence*
Of the five most outstanding problems among those
most frequently reported, three were in the division of
school life, one was concerned with boy and girl relation­
ships, and one with vocation*
Of the five most serious
problems reported, one belonged to the area of boy and
girl relationships, two to that of vocation, and two
to school life*
The most common and serious problems in each
section had certain trends and characteristics peculiar
to each.
There were as followss
School life difficulties were concerned with the
present school conditions rather than with future educa­
tional training*
The outstanding disturbances were, a
heavy school load, lack of confidence to express onefs
self, and a lack of satisfaction in the subjects being
studied in regard to success achieved and their value
in the future.
The theme of the problems of home life was a lack
of harmony in the home*
Understanding and agreement c
120
between the girl and her parents, more companionship^
the ability to please and show appreciation, were the
felt needs*
Nine out of the ten most common and most
serious problems pertained to matters involving girl and
parent relationships*
problems of the division of boy and girl relation­
ships arose from a lack of understanding of boys*
The
desire was to become acquainted and to be at ease with
them.
The queries involvedda wide area, from a way to
become acquainted, to problems concerning marriage.
Vocational difficulties revealed a lack of infor­
mation and indecision concerning the aspects of making a
living*
The needs were to learn abilities and aptitudes
toward choosing a suitable vocation, become acquainted
with available occupations, and know how to get and keep
a job.
The questions concerning friends pertained to the
qualities necessary to make new friends rather than to
troubles which arise among friends.
They expressed an
earnest desire to be liked, to be friendly, and to have
a democratic spirit within the schools.
The religious difficulties revealed serious
thought.
The trend of the problems was that of better
understanding of religion, the endeavor to live up to
high standards, and the wish to improve one*s self.
121
Health problems were of an Impersonal nature.
need for information was the major request.
The
The only
anxieties of a serious nature were those of girls with
poor health who needed help in planning a future and
avoiding maladjustments.
No central tendency existed in the problems of
recreation.
A variety of perplexities were listed includ­
ing needs of time, money, personal interest, parental
interest, approval of activities, and suitable places for
recreation.
Money annoyances were centered around two areas.
The most troublesome was the lack of funds for such as
school activities, recreation, and college entrance fees;
the one of minor significance was the care of money to
keep from spending it foolishly, and knowing how to save it.
Two major queries were expressed in regard to
clothes, that of money to buy clothes, and details of how
to wear them becomingly.
The problems were of an im­
personal nature.
Miscellaneous problems pertained to self-improve­
ment.
They were of an emotional nature including problems
which cause mentcl distress.
The problems not contained in tables throughout the
sections were of the same general nature as the first ten
most common and most serious ones.
They received in many
122
instances almost the same scores as the first ten.
In each of the three schools practically the same
problems were most frequently reported, though the "Ranking
by school" varied.
While most of the students had a large number of
difficulties, comparatively few were of a serious nature.
The most serious problems, in degree of detriment, were
reported by a small number of girls.
Economic status was considered to have been the
cause for certain differences which existed among the
three schools concerning the importance of the problems
to the girls within each building.
Determined through
"Ranking by school," the following facts were noted:
In the division of home life the girls of
school (the school of low economic status) were less
interested in the companionship of their parents, or of
convincing them of their appreciation.
The section of the boy and girl relationships dis­
closed that the girls of "C" school were not so concerned
about getting or refusing dates, and feeling at ease when
in the presence of boys.
In the area of vocation the girls of "A" school
(the school of the high economic status) cared less about
securing jobs, or worrying over finances.
There was a smaller number of girls in "C" school
1£3
having problems concerning friends.
Recreation worries were minor ones to the girls
of
"A" school wherever the problems concerned a need of
money to enjoy activities and have better recreation places
in the bity.
The section concerning money distinctly revealed
that money anxieties were insignificant to the girls of
"A" school in comparison to those of the other two schools*
The guidance methods used to meet the problems in
the various sections within the schools were closely re­
lated, although the approach in several instances was
from a different angle.
According to the outline and the
results of the "problemsire" the effects were as follows:
The percentage of girls reporting difficulties in
the area of school life was from 67.1 to 47.1 per cent,
as of the most common problems.
The disturbances listed
were of a more personal nature than those which would be
covered by the methods indicated.
The schools were successful in teaching proper
ideals and attitudes toward the home.
The problems
indicated a need for more personal methods and more con­
tact with the home, by the school.
They were reported
from 54.3 to 29.5 per cent.
Problems of boy and girl relationships, from 61.1
124
to 40.2 per cent, disclosed a lack of promoting friendly
relationships between the girls and the boys.
The most
serious difficulties had been reduced through the methods
employed in the schools.
Methods to meet vocational problems apparently
created interest and acquainted the girls with the
personal qualities necessary to be successful in onefs
work;
but the need was expressed for more information
about occupations and
aptitudes.
knowledge of their abilities and
Difficulties were reported from 61.1 to 44.4
per cent.
Harmony predominated among the girls.
The problems
concerned in increasing onefs friendships were reported
from 52.2 to 30.7 per cent.
Religious problems, from 25.9 to 12.8 per cent of
the girls, were alleviated as adequately as possible
through school situations.
Health hindrances were handled efficiently with
two exceptions, that of relieving fatigue and helping the
physically handicapped.
The frequency was from 46.8 to
13.1 per cent.
Recreation provided within the school was deemed
sufficient.
The money and places for after-school activ­
ities puzzled from 45.3 to 21.1 per cent of the girls.
Methods used to eradicate money difficulties were
125
satisfactory as far as conducted.
Classroom instruction
and more individual help were wanted by 40,8 to 26,8 per
cent.
Problems pertaining to clothes required only more
detail for solution.
The frequency was from 44,7 to 27,7
per cent,
Miscellaneous problems were very much in need of
individual attention.
The effect to meet these weakness­
es was indicated by one of the sehools,
Conclusions and recommendations.
The questionnaire
method of conducting a study to determine the nature of
senior girls* personal difficulties is an adequate one.
Through this avenue the true needs and attitudes can be
discovered.
The original essay papers revealed reactions
and conditions exceedingly valuable to those working with
senior girls.
The "problemsire* has been successful in
discovering their innermost needs and
difficulties.
Co­
operation and sincerity on the part of those responding
were evidenced by the written comments on the essay papers
and "problemsires.n
The 535 senior girls studied were
considered to be an adequate sampling and valid in nature
I
because of the concentrated area, and the study being con­
ducted within two imarBths of the close of the senior year
of school.
136
The most common and most serious problems of the
various areas disclosed certain trends and needs.
The
following were the most pronounced;
The requirements of home study were too severe, and
took too much time from home life activities and recreation.
The result was over-fatigue and anxiety.
Acquisition of
better study habits in earlier school life would have
been helpful.
Timidity, lack of confidence, and inferior feelings
resulted either from not enough experience in self-express­
ion or too much negative criticism.
These problems, if
neglected, result in emotional disturbances.
Indications
were noted among the miscellaneous problems.
Such conditions
made it evident that the girls were unable to be self­
directing.
Friendship problems among girls, and boys and girls,
indicated a need for promoting democratic relationships.
This applied to all three schools, in degree.
The desire for more freedom and independence was a
source of friction between the girls and their parents.
Closer contact between school and home should help to pro­
mote better understanding.
Difficulties caused by expenses should be disen­
tangled, including those of the senior year.
187
Guidance is needed in overcoming indecision, par­
ticularly in making a vocational choice.
Economic status was responsible for the nature of
some problems.
These applied to areas of money, securing
jobs instead of continuing schooling, democratic rela­
tions between girls, and between boys and girls, and
parental companionship.
The first two problems were more
important to gi±ls of WC" school and comparatively in­
consequential to girls of "A" school;
problems were the reverse.
the second two
The problems of "B" school
were not outstanding in any particular manner;
their
scores were equally as high as those of the other two
schools.
These findings within the three schools would
be expected to apply to other schools of similar environ­
ments,
The implications would be that methods of meeting
the problems of different areas should not be the same
for all schools, but be individualized according to the
needs.
The exact degree of effectiveness of the guidance
methods was difficult to determine because of the brevity
and lack of detail of the responses received.
It is pos­
sible that a number of methods were overlooked when they
were being listed by the counselors.
Wherein certain pro­
nounced weaknesses occurred a check on the methods revealed
138
that supplementary guidance was needed to make the neces­
sary adjustments.
Credit is due to the counselors and
others responsible for the girls* guidance.
Without the
help received the problems would doubtlessly have bhen
of a much more serious nature.
A small number of problems,
particularly pertaining to the home, indicated that a few
girls were sorely in need of help.
The element of time
may have been responsible for lack of more personal con­
tact and instruction.
A
comparison of the present with previous related
studies discloses that the areas of interest of senior
girls and those of all adolescent girls are much the same.
The results of former studies have varied, the greatest
number of problems not being in the same areas;
although,
on the whole, they are mostly centered around home life,
boy and girl relationships, personality development, vo­
cation, school life, and money.
The present study resulted
in a combination of areas not found in any other research,
that of school life, boy and girl relationships, vocation,
and home life.
An analysis of the problems of adolescent
girls in general and of senior girls exclusively would
probably reveal a difference in types of problems.
Those
listed by senior girls were the expression of mature mainds.
It is regrettable that the problems of school life evi­
dently play such a major part in the lives of girls about
129
to graduate from high school*
The general literature on
adolescence, psychology, and mental hygiene indicated the
needs to be the same as those found in this study.
The
girls crave a feeling of personal success and security.
They are not aware of the purposes in their schooling, nor
are they able to arrive at definite decisions for the
future.
Many are emotionally undeveloped.
In general,
they lack the knowledge and techniques which are essential
to the management of personal problems.
The following are recommended:
1. More time for helpful guidance to girls with
particular problems and needs.
2. Provisions made in previous grades to relieve
personal problems before the senior year.
3. Vocational guidance in building confidence,
choosing a vocation according to interests and aptitudes,
and securing a position for a satisfactory future.
4. More helpful guidance in matters concerning
democratic relations with fellow students, marriage
instruction, and leisure-time activities.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Andrus, Ethel P., "The Development of an Educational
Program for the High School Girl Based on a Critical
Study of Her Nature and Her Needs*" Unpublished
Doctorfs dissertation, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1930* 484 pp.
Arlitt, Ada Hart, The Adolescent*
Booh Co., Inc., 1938* 842 pp*
New York:
McGraw-Hill
Austin, Mary Alice, "An Analysis of Certain Personal
Problems of an Unselected Group of High School
Girls." Unpublished Masterfs thesis, The University
of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1937* 310 pp.
Averill, Lawrence A., Adolescence* Cambridge, Mas­
sachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1936. 495 pp.
Bigelow, Maurice A . , Adolescence.
Wagnalls, Col, 193V. 99 pp.
New York;
Punk and
Brown, Marion, "A Study of Adolescents in the University
High School, Oakland, California," Proceedings of
the Twenty-First Annual Meeting of the National
Association of Deans of Women. Washington, ft.C,:
Nationa1 Associa t ion of Deans of Women, June, 1937.
pp. 112-121.
Burnham, William H . , The Wholesome Personality.
York: D* Appleton-Century 6o., Inc., 1932.
New
713 pp.
Cox, P.W.L., and John Carr Duff, Guidance by the
Classroom Teacher. New York: Pren tic e-Hall Inc.,
1938. 535 pp.
Douglass, Harl, "Secondary Education for Youth in
Modern America," A Report to the American Youth
Commission of the American ZTouncll on Education.
Washington,T. &.: American CounciT"on Education,
1937. 137 pp.
Hertzler, Alverda Elizabeth, "A Study of the Personal
Problems of High School Girls in Certain Southern
California Secondary Schools." Unpublished Masterfs
thesis, The University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, 1939. 194 pp.
132
Jobe, Claire W . , "Education for Marriage in Secondary
Schools." Unpublished Masterfs thesis, The Univer­
sity of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1938.
143 pp.
Jones, Maud M . , "An Investigation of the Adjustment
Problems of High School Pupils." Unpublished
Masterfs thesis, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1934. 95 pp.
Kast, Emma «T., "A Comparative Study and Analysis of the
Problems of £ iris in a Four-Year High School."
Unpublished Master*s thesis, ?The University of
Southern /California, Los Angeles, 1936. 151 pp.
Kent, Lois, "Teaching of Family Relationships in Second­
ary Schools." Unpublished Master*s thesis, The
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1933.
170 pp.
Leonard, Eugenie
, Problems of Freshman College Girls.
New York: Teachers College, Columbia University,
1932. 139 pp;
Morgan, I. H. B., Child Psychology. New York:
and Rinehart, Inc.., 1934. 502 pp.
Farrar
. The Psychology of the Unadjusted School Child.
New York: The Macmillan Co., 1936. 539 pp.
3h?essey, S. L., Psychology and the New Education.
York: Harper Br o ther s , 1933. 594 pp.
New
Reedy, Rolls A . , "A Study of the Personal Problems of
High School Students." Unpublished Masterfs thesis,
The University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
1937. 56 pp.
Sherman, Mandel, Mental Hygiene and Education.
Longmans, Green and fioT, I&34. 326 pp.
New York:
Smithies, Elsie May, Case Studies of Normai Adolescent
Girls. New York: D. Appleton^entury Co., Inc., 1933.
294 pp.
Stephen, Frances, "An Investigation of the Mental Health
Problems of the Girls of Gardena High School." Un­
published Masterfs thesis, The University of
Southern California, Los Angeles, 1936. 119 pp.
133
Strang, Ruth M . , "Problems of Adolescents Which Come
to Deans," Junior Senior High School Clearing
House, 7:29-34* September, 1932•
Symonds, P. M., "life Problems and Interests of Adol­
escents." School Review. 44:506-518. September.
1936.
. Mental Hygiene of the School Child.
the Macmillan C o 1936. 301 pp.
New York:
Thorpe, Louis P., Psychological Foundations of Person­
ality. New York; /llcSraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., 1938.
Whipple, Guy Montrose, "Guidance in Educational Insti­
tutions," Thirty-Fifth Yearbook of the National
Society for the Study of Education. Part I.
Bloomington /Illinois: Public School Publishing
Co., 1938. pp. 121-268 .
Witty, Paul A., Charles E. Skinner, and others, Mental
Hygiene and Modern Education. New York: Farrar
and Rinehart, 1939. 539 pp.
APPENDIX
THE PERSONAL PROBLEMS OF SENIOR GIRIS
Purpose of the study:
to find the reel problems
of senior girls, those that they feel to be their own
personal difficulties*
If the school could learn the nature of the girlsf
problems, from their point of view, they would Enow
wherein they could be of more help, and the school program
arranged to fit
their needs*
youth would know more of
For instance, counselors of
the problems, special classes
could be taught in an attempt to answer them, and P.T*A*
programs might be able to include speakers who woujd give
information to parents*
Knowing the difficulties which senior girls have
had during the year would contribute toward helping senior
girls in the future.
The troubles of senior girls seem to fall under the
following headings:
School life
Home life
Boy and girl relationships
Vocation
Friends
Religion
Health
136
Recreation
Money
Clothes
Miscellaneous.
The problems may be listed or written out in
essay form.
There is no need for the girls to sign their
papers; no attempt will be made to identify any!
The
students, therefore, should feel perfectly free to write
their difficulties#
The value of the study rests wholly upon the
girls* honesty and frankness.
PLEASE LIST THE METHODS USED, IN EACH DIVISION,
TO MEET THE GIRLS • PROBLEMS*
I*
SCHOOL LIFE
II. HOME LIFE
III. BOY AND GIRL RELATIONSHIPS
IV. VOCATION
V.
FRIENDS
VI. RELIGION
VH.
Villi
HEALTH
RECREATION
IX.
X.
XI.
MONEY
CLOTHES
MISCELLANEOUS
WHAT IS THE ENROLLMENT OF THE SCHOOL?
WHAT IS THE ENROLLMENT OF THE SENIOR GIRLS?
SENIOR GIRLS* "PROBLEMAIRE"
This "problemaire" is for the purpose of learning the
senior girls* personal problems, and thereby to enable those
who work with senior girls to be of more help in the solving
of these problems*
The problems listed ere those which other senior girls
have expressed to be their own personal difficulties*
Will you assist in helping the senior girls of the
future by indicating your problems? No attempt will be made
to identify a paper. The value of this study rests upon
your henesty and frankness. Your co-operation will be
greatly appreciated.
INSTRUCTIONS
In front of the statements on the following pages you
will find the words "Yes" and "No." If the statement ex­
presses a difficulty which you feel is troubling you, circle
the word "Yes." If It is not a problem to you, circle the
word "No." Please circle one of these words for every
problem given.
In each section of the "problemsire" place the
numbers from **1B to "3" after the statements which are the
most serious to you; number "1" being the most serious,
and number "3" the least serious*
Example s
Yes
Yes
No
No
How to get to school on time.
How to keep from worrying about
having a good time
(
1
)
(______ )
SENIOR GIRLS ? "PROBLEMAIRE"
PART I - SCHOOL LIFE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
9 128 Yes
No
65 Yes
61 Yes
No
No
57 Yes
No
63 Yes
No
88
3 160
6 141
8 130
89 Yes
No
107 Yes
No
10 125 Yes
No
62 Yes
No
82 Yes
5 146 Yes
No
No
111 Yes
No
1 177 Yes
No
* 4 159 Yes
No
57 Yes
No
91 Yes
No
2 170 Yes
No
72 Yes
No
92
123
7 131
67
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
55 Yes
No
How to decide what college to attend.
How to concentrate.
How to get all of the home work done*
How to get your home work done without
staying up too late at night*
How to have a good time and keep up
with your school work*
How to get the teacher to understand you*
How to work your way through the
university*
How to work on the outside of school
and get your school work done, too.
How to know the requirements of various
colleges*
How to deeide whether to go to college or
to find a job*
How to keep from worrying abour y6&r
studies*
How to budget your time when doing
school work*
How to have a place to study at home in
privacy.
How to become more finterested in school*
How to know which subjects will help you
most when you graduate from high school*
How to prepare in high school to meet
life when you can’t go to college*
How to become interested in subjects you
don’t like.
How to stand up in front of the class and
give an oral report.
Should you go to college and take just
the subjects you want to take?
How' to get any good out of the courses
you are taking.
How to get more experience in appearing
before people.
How to know if good grades are worth the
effort*
How to hold school offices*
How to learn to like to study.
How to make better grades*
How to keep illness at home from inter­
fering with your school work.
How to study with the radio*
H5
2lX
3
5
166
8
161
~m
9
69
75
80
118
148
158 10
190
109
185
6
146
225
1
203
4
70
125
217
2
95
TTf
166
TTO
7
81
“T T
142
PART
72 Yes
9
77 Yes
4
93 Yes
5
89 Yes
59 Yes
49 Yes
39 Yes
7
87 Yes
1 142 Yes
59 Yes
68 Yes
8
86 Yes
62 Yes
33 Yes
57 Yes
60 Yes
48 Yes
3 107 Yes
49 Yes
66 Yes
35 Yes
41 Yes
20 Yes
42 Yes
42 Yes
II - HOME LIFE
How to sit down with your mother end
talk over your problems with her.
No How to get your work done at home and
not he too tired to study when you have
finished it.
No How to have more companionship; with
your parents.
How
to have a place to entertain your
No
friends.
No How to have more freedom to come and go.
No How to know the proper hour to get home
from a date.
No How to keep from being afraid of your
parents.
No How to get your parents to have more
confidence in you.
No How to keep your parents from worrying
about you when you go out at night.
No How to get along with the members of the
family.
No How to make the people with whom you live
understand you.
No How to keep quarreling out of the home.
No How to convince your parents that you can
be trusted.
No Should your parents request you to go out
with them a great deal?
No How to get your parents to realize how
important a date is to a girl.
No Should you go out with your parents to
please them, when you have made other
iplans?
No How to help your parents to get along
better together.
No How to get your folks to realize that you
are grown up.
No How to have more privacy in your home.
No How to get your folks to reason with you.
No How to get your parents to treat your
friends courteously.
No How to convince your parents that you are
old enough to have a date.
No Should you give up dancing because your
parents believe it is wrong?
No How often should you have a date?
No How to keep from feeling inferior when
your sister is more talented than you.
No
( 98)
(1031 9
(117) 5
(106) 8
nns)
(62)
(49)
(112) 6
(182) 1
(84)
( 94)
(US)
7
( 76)
( 41)
( 76)
(79)
(63)
(132) 3
r w j
CSS)
( 38)
( 50)
(25)
( 64)
(55)
143
10
73 Yes
No
6
89 Yes
No
25 Yes
49 Yes
No
No
67 Yes
Ncr
33 Yes
No
52 Yes
No
2 112 Yes
No
How to get your parents to let you take
the car.
Should you work for good grades to please
your parents?
,
How to get' along with your older sister.
How to keep your parents from planning
your future.
How to get your parents to tell you
things a girl should know.
How to make your father realize the harm
'he is doing to the family when he drinks.
How to keep the family from using what
belongs to you.
How to convince your parents that you
appreciate what they are doing for you.
( 99)10
(124) 4
( 58)
( 60)
( 93)
(45)
( 69)
(155) 2
PART III - BOY AND GIRL RELATIONSHIPS
1 165 Yes
4 124 Yes
No
No
59 Yes
No
5 122 Yes
6 114 Yes
2 144 Yes
10 99 Yes
No
No
No
No
76 Yes
3 128 Yes
No
No
81 Yes
76 Yes
44 Yes
No
No
No
8 108 Yes
51 Yes
No
No
9 107 Yes
94 Yes
30 Yes
No
No
No
41 Yes
No
7 114 Yes
97 Yea
No
No
How to meet hoys >you would like to know. (205) 1
How to know what to talk aboutnwheh you r
(155) 4
are out.with the hoy friend.
How oto keep the friendship of a boy
without drinking or "necking."
( 81)
How to get dates for the senior events.
(155 r~5
How to get acquainted with the boys.
(146) 7
How to be popular.
2
Should a senior girl go out with a college
(129)
boy?
Should you go "steady"?
(2HE)
How to get the boys who are friendly
(166) 3
with you to ask for a date.
(U5) 3
How to better understand the boys.
How to entertain boy friends.
(101)
How to know how many boy friends you
should have.
(62)
How to feel at home with new boy friends. ( W ) 8
How to get your parents to like your
boy friends.
( 71)
How to keep up a conversation with a boy. (12*7) 9
Should you correnpond with boys?
(Tgg)
How to know what age your boy friend
should be.
( 48)
How to choose a boy friend whom your
parents will like.
( 59)
(154) 6
How to refuse a date gracefully.
Should you go out with older boys if high
(124)
school boys seem too young for you?
144
96 Yes
54 Yes
No
No
42 Yes
No
55 Yes
No
48 Yes
No
28 Yes
No
32 Yes
No
76 Yes
No
63 Yes
64 Yes
87 Yes
No
No
No
90 Yes
No
69 Yes
No
83 Yes
No
67 Yes
64 Yes
No
No
99 Yes
No
68 Yes
No
How to overcome shyness when with a boyt
How to keep from having trouble with your
parents over dates.
How to keep your parents from embarrassing
your boy friends.
How to have boy friends without being
talked about.
Should you end your friendship with a
boy if your parents don#t like him®
How to convince your parents you are
old enough to go out with a boy.
How to be a lady when you are out with
a boy.
How to know whether or not to accept
"blind dates."
How to get your boy friend to dance.
How to be interested in boys your own age.
How to get acquainted with boys when
you are new in the school.
How to keep up a conversation while
dancing.
How to get boys to better understand
girls.
How to plan for marriage and a career,
too.
How to get information about marriage.
How to determine the proper age for
marriage.
How to know if your boy friend is the
one you should marry.
How to know if you should get married
now or wait until your boy friend can
make more money.
118fr
75)
56)
75)
66)
37)
44)
109)
n§F)
jH)
120)
lie)
99)
118)
l6fe)
89)
155)10
90)
PART IV - VOCATION
p
1 157 Yes
No
4 150
71
Yes No
Yes No
8 118
9 116
Ill
Yes No
Yes No
Yes No
How to know what jobs are open to high
school graduates.
How to choose a vocation to suit you.
How to find work which will make it
possible to go through college.
How to have more faith in your future.
How to know if you have any talent.
How to determine before entering college
what you would like to be.
(205) 1
(161) 4
(159)
145
5 137 Yes
No
68 Yes
No
6 137 Yes
3 151 Yes
104 Yes
No
No
No
10 115 Yes
51 Yes
No
No
2 153 Yes
No
81 Yes
No
79 Yes
No
82 Yes
No
107 Yes
No
83 Yes
No
7 127 Yes
No
How to determine your ability when choosini
a vocation.
Should you attempt to go to college when
your grades are low?
How to know where to apply for a job.
How to apply for a job.
How to get information about vocations
before reaching your senior year.
How to know more about unusual vocations.
How to convince your parents that you
want to choose your own vocation.
How to secure a job when so many are
without jobs.
How to develop more enthusiasm for a
vocation.
How to find wnrk when you are under the
age limit.
How to take more subjects in high school
which would help you decide upon your
vocation.
How to overcome timidity so it wonft be a
hindrance to your vocation.
How to know if a career would be worth
the money.
How to have more poise so that you can
hold a good job.
6
84)
188) 5
Tfg) 3
134)
I%B) 9
149)10
168) 7
PART V - FRIENDS
8
87 Yes
63 Yes
No
No
5
95 Yes
No
2 119 Yes
29 Yes
No
No
69 Yes
4 103 Yes
74 Yes
No
No
No
69 Yes
No
43 Yes
No
60 Yes
No
How to get into the best social cliques.
How to know whom to choose for your
friends.
How to make friends of the girls with
whom you would like to associate.
How to make people like you.
How to know if you should drink and
smoke to make friends.
How to learn to like people.
How to make friends easily.
How to overcome sensitiveness so that
you can make more friends.
How to keep friends from talking about
you.
How to make friends when your home isnft
as nice as you would like it to be.
How to have a place, to entertain your
friends.
(113) 9
(Ig9) 5
(151) 2
( 37)
( 9b)
(136) 4
(103)10
146
10
33 Yes
82 Yes
No
No
7
90 Yes
No
9
84 Yes
No
70 Yes
3 115 Yes
51 Yes
No
No
No
1 134 Yes
No
98 Yes
No
59 Yes
No
6
How to keep out ofbad company!
(45)
How to have friends and yet keep out
of cliques.
(99)
How to get a more friendly spirit in
the school.
(118)8
How to act when you are with friends
whom* you feel* are above you socially.
(119) 7
How to overcome shyness when with friends.( $3)
How to make a wide circle of friends.
(181)3
How to be at ease with people of your
own age.
( 71)
How to keep up a conversation when you
meet a new person.
(175)1
How to make friends when you are new in
the building.
(126)6
How to get your friends to co-operate
in school activities.
(84)
PART VI - RELIGION
3
60 Yes
No
5
51 Yes
No
-
2
9
7
1
4
6
10
8
61
36
49
65
54
89
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
81 Yes
No
50
28
31
30
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
28 Yes
No
39 Yes
No
How to know what you should really be­
lieve.
How to know if you should marry a boy of
a different religion.
How to understand religion.
How to have more religion in the home.
How to get yourself to go to church.
How to live up to your religious ideals.
How to have faith in religion.
How to find a church that will fit your
needs.
How to decide between two different
churches.
How to have time for religious activities.
How to organize church social clubs.
How to have religion in the school.
How to get along with a person of a
different religion.
. How to agree with your parents about
religion.
How to see good in each religion.
(81) 2
(75)
csd
c m
QE>
rw)
CVS)
4
3
9
7
1
5
(37)
(31)
rgg) 6
rwj
(43)10
( 42)
(34)
C5S) 8
147
PAST VII - HEALTH
3
82 Yes
No
4
79 Yes
No
10
29 Yes
No
21 Yes
No
19 Yes
No
60 Yes
No
7
-
69 Yes
No
2 111 Yes
18 Yes
No
No
8
5
9
No
No
No
6
45 Yes
74 Yes
38 Yes
17 Yes
No
1 123 Yes
20 Yes
No
No
How to do your home work without
weakening your eyes*
How to reduce without nharming your
health*
How to keep poor health from being
a handicap to your future*
How to plan your future when you have
poor health*
How to have fun with people when you
have poor health.
How to keep your health when you have
so much to do at home and at school*
How to keep from being susceptible to
colds.
How to keep from being tired in school.
How to choose your vocation when you
haven9t good health*
How to increase your weight.
How to know what causes a headache.
How to know what medicines you should
take.
How to enter into sports when your
health isnft good*
How to take care of your skin*
How to plan your future when you know
that you have a permanent physical defect.
( 99) 4
(104) 3
( 44) 10
( 33)
( 27)
( 73) 7
( 95) 5
(T£7) 2
(30)
fW) 8
6
CM)
( 50) 9
-
( 25)
(IW ) 1
( 59)
PART VIII - RECREATION
42 Yes
No
1 117 Yes
No
48 Yes
No
3
85 Yes
No
2
96 Yes
No
8
55 Yes
No
10
61 Yes
No
9
54 Yes
20 Yes
No
No
How to find the best places in the city
for recreation.
How to get your school work done and
still have time for recreation.
How to have time for recreation when you
will be working your way through the
university*
How to get money to join friends in
recreation*
How to have enough money for school and
recreation, too.
How to get better recreation places in
the city.
How to find suitable places for a high
school girl to go in the evening.
How to use your spare time.
How to convince your parents of the
importance of going with girls your own
age.
( 59)
( 158)
(61)
(115) 3
(1S5) 2
( 76) 9
( 79) 7
(71)10
( 29)
148
6
4
5
7
67 Yes
No
43 Yes
No
72 Yes
No
42 Yes
No
42 Yes
No
29 Yes
No
71 Yes
No
25 Yes
No
56 Yes
No
How to keep up with all of the senior
activities,
How to convince your parents that you
need more time for recreation.
How to get parents to agree with you on
the hours you should come home in the
evening.
How to get your parents to realize the
importance of recreation.
How to know if it is proper for a high
school girl to go to a night club.
How to become more interested in
recreation.
How to be considered a lady and yet
enjoy the games which boys play.
How to get. your friends interested in
recreation.
How to act when you go to nice places.
PART
1 104 Yes
6
No
83 Yes
69 Yes
No
No
43 Yes
No
8
77 Yes
No
9
75 Yes
No
5
91 Yes
No
61 Yes
2 101 Yes
No
No
46 Yes
No
7
78 Yes
No
10
75 Yes
No
4
3
93 Yes
96 Yes
No
No
54 Yes
No
( 85) 6
( 56)
( 99) 5
( 51)
( 57)
( 57)
(105) 4
( 58)
(~77) 8
IX - MONEY
How to have as much spending money as
other girls seem to have.
How to get enough money to go to college.
How to come to an agreement with your
parents on an allowance.
How to get your weekly allowance to cover
your lunches and school supplies.
How to have enough money to keep up with
your friends*
How to get your parents to realize how
much money it takes for everyday expenses.
How to keep school affaires from requir­
ing so much money.
How to budget your allowance.
How to meet the expenses of the senior
year.
How to work for the things you need and
keep up with school work.
How to help your parents when they are in
financial difficulties.
How to decline an invitation gracefully
when you havsnH the money to go.
How to save your money.
How to keep ;/from spending your money
foolishly.
How to have confidence without having
money.
157) 1
~sn>) 8
83)
58)
96) 9
90) 10
116) 4
"W)
156) 2
68)
106) 6
105) 7
Tig) 5
119) 3
71)
149
PART
No
8
3
7
74 Yes
90 Yes
81 Yes
No
No
No
1 118 Yes
4 88 Yes
No
No
5
88 Yes
66 Yes
No
No
6
10
84 Yes
68 Yes
64 Yes
No
No
No
46 Yes
No
70 Yes
No
59 Yes
No
9
How to know what to wear on different
occasions*
How to dress nicely hut inexpensively.
How to dress to suit your personality.
How to feel well dressed with an
ordinary amount of clothes.
How to have new clothes more often.
How to dress nicely without depriving
the family.
How to know when to wear a hat.
How to attend parties without feeling
inferior to the girls who have nicer
clothes.
How to know the best way to wear clothes.
How to choose your clothes.
How to dress when you are going out with
a boy.
How to keep your sister from wearing
your clothes.
How to know the colors which make you
the most attractive.
How to keep your clothes in a good
condition.
(129) Z
f“W ) 8
(TM) 3
H
98 Yes
a
z
X - CLOTHES
6
(150) 1
(114) 5
(TzU) 4
( 86)
(W) 7
rss)
( 94) 9
( 56)
( 93)10
(84)
PART XT - MISCELLANEOUS
4 122
89
3 126
1 144
8 102
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
66 Yes
No
5 113 Yes
10 90 Yes
No
No
10 90 Yes
2 130 Yes
9 98 Yes
7 108 Yes
6 113 Yes
No
No
No
No
No
How to keep from being moody.
How to overcome blushing.
How to have a nice personality.
How to le arn to be charming.
How to keep your mind away from your
troubles.
How to tell the trivial things from the
important ones.
How to control your temper.
How to keep from being easily
embarrassed.
How to keep from being sensitive.
How to get over being self-conscious.
How to keep from being irritable.
How to develop confidence.
How to keep from daydreaming.^
(150 4
(xnr 9
(I5ET 3
(177
(155 ) 8
( 90
(til
7
(111
(TIT
(TTY 2
( T H 10
(T£S 5
(131 6
150
PLEASE WRIT! ANY PROBLEMS YOU HAVE WHICH ARE NOT
INCLUDED IN THE "PROBLEMAIRE."
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
6 824 Кб
Теги
sdewsdweddes
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа