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FortLewisPres_JPL - Colorado Space Grant Consortium

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DemoSat IV:
Cosmic Ray Detection
If they’re out there, we’ll find them.
Joanna Gordon
Shane Mayer-Gawlik
Alden Cooper
August 9, 2006
*Space photos from Gateway to Space class launch in 2005 by team Hooligans*
Mission Statement and Goals
• Successfully detect cosmic rays.
• See transition from a ground radiation dominated
environment, to a cosmic radiation dominated one.
• Using a haze reducing lens, reduce the haze in photos.
• Using voice recorder, observe the change in sound from
the clicks of the Geiger counter as the lack of air
increases and as a back up memory source for geiger
counter.
• Using a HOBO data logger, record temperature, and
humidity inside and outside the box.
The Beginning
• We started from scratch at least four times.
• We started with trying to build our own Geiger counter,
utilizing a series of charged grids.
• We moved on to dual 300 mm Ultra-AS detectors linked
to a single fast acting pre-amplifier.
Design Issues
• Geiger counter wand had to stay in a pressurized container. To
accomplish this, we used a Nalgene bottle and lots of glue.
• Needed a big box to house our delicate circuit board and Geiger
counter.
• Nalgene bottle needed to be placed vertical and not be able to
move.
• Mount batteries, camera, timing switches, and heaters in a place
where they wouldn’t move and hit Geiger counter or circuit board.
• Box must stay warm to keep batteries from failing. To accomplish
this we used two layers of insulation, resistor heater, and hand
warmers to heat the large interior of our box
• In case battery on Board of Education failed, we have two backup
batteries to make sure that nothing gets erased or overwritten.
• Because of our huge box, we ended up going over the wait limit by
600 grams, for a grand total of 2.1Kg.
• Our cost ended up at $550.00.
Adress 1
0
Adress 0
Pin 3
Pin 2
Pin 1
V2
5Vdc
1
1
24LC256
1
24LC256
DS1602
V1
3Vdc
Ocilator
R1
R2
10k
10k
V3
5Vdc
Pin 4
Pin 5
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Setup:
PAUSE 10000
Clock_Setup:
'Check to see if this is an accidental reset (battery failure).
READ 10, Temp.LOWBYTE
READ 11, Temp.HIGHBYTE
IF Temp <> 0 THEN Record
'No data written, zero clock (clock time used as addresses)
•
•
LOW RST
HIGH RST
•
SHIFTOUT DQ, CLK, LSBFIRST, [Protocol1]
•
•
LOW RST
HIGH RST
•
SHIFTOUT DQ, CLK, LSBFIRST, [Protocol2]
•
•
LOW RST
HIGH RST
•
SHIFTOUT DQ, CLK, LSBFIRST, [Protocol3]
•
LOW RST
Final circuit board
Our original circuit, with Nalgene
bottle and Geiger counter
Original circuit
Layout of box
HOBO Data Logger and camera with
timing circuit
Results
What Worked, and What Didn’t
• We got data from our Geiger counter for roughly
an hour ( actual 4675 sec) or 60,000-70,000
feet. At this point we started getting erratic
irrelevant data, then the wand stopped working.
• A wire from our camera came out right after
launch, so we ended without any pictures.
• Got temperature, dew point, and humidity data
from the HOBO Data Logger.
• Got sound from the sound recorder.
Results
Cosmic Ray Data
800
600
Series1
400
200
Counts Per Second
Counts Per Second
Comsic Ray Data Complete
0
0
2000
4000
6000
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Series1
0
8000
1000
2000
Cosmic Ray Data
5000
Cosmic Ray Data
50
Series1
2300
2800
3300
Time(s)
3800
4300
4800
Counts Per Second
Counts Per Second
4000
Time(s)
Time(s)
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
1800
3000
40
30
Series1
20
10
0
2000
2500
3000
3500
Time(s)
4000
4500
Results
Temperature
60
20
0
21:40.0
50:00.0
18:20.0
46:40.0
15:00.0
43:20.0
11:40.0
40:00.0
08:20.0
36:40.0
05:00.0
33:20.0
01:40.0
-40
Series1
30:00.0
-20
Series2
-60
-80
Time (s)
Series one: Temp inside box
Series two: Temp outside box
Dew Point and Humidity
30
20
-20
Time (s)
Series one: Dew point
Series two: Humidity
45:30.0
12:00.0
38:30.0
05:00.0
31:30.0
58:00.0
24:30.0
51:00.0
17:30.0
-10
44:00.0
Series2
10:30.0
0
37:00.0
Series1
03:30.0
10
30:00.0
Dew Point(C) and
Humidity(gm/M3)
This data shows that
our box design to
keep everything
warm worked
flawlessly, as we
never even got close
to freezing.
Temperature (C)
40
Benefit to NASA
• NASA could benefit from the use of
Nalgene bottles. Not only are they the
most durable thing on earth to use for
pressurized containers, they also make
great water bottles.
• Additionally our data could help determine
the amount of radiation exposure vital
instruments receive during the course of a
flight.
Lessons Learned
• Set reasonable deadlines/budgets and
stick to them.
• Do not reinvent the wheel or Geiger
counter as it were.
• The most important thing we learned is
never to give up. Even with failure after
failure, we managed to get a working
payload to launch, and get useable data.
A Very Special Thanks
• This project would never have come
together if it wasn’t for the help of Randy
Emmons from Adams State, and from our
professor, Craig Tyler.
Dr Tyler
Questions
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