close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Autumn

код для вставкиСкачать
To Autumn
1.
SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.
2.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinГ©d flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.
3.
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.
Stanza 1
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Autumn: a season of harvest; fruiting stage
Metaphors of the autumn: “close bosom-friend of the maturing sun,”
“Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness”
“him” пѓ the sun
“bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run ” пѓ bless the vines
that run round the thatch-eves with fruit
“load and bless”: Autumn and the sun not only load but also bless the vines
with fruit. The effects of using the word bless may include autumn’s
benediction over the ripening of the fruits and its power to enrich the
fertility of nature.
“To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-treesвЂќпѓ To bend the moss’d
cottage-trees with apples пѓ The apples become so numerous that their
weight bends the trees.
“to set budding more ”: -ing form suggests activity that is continuing
“And still more ” suggests the mushrooming of flowers
Use of flashback : line 9 - line 11(cause and effect are reversed)
Stanza 2
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Autumn: lax or resting; the stage of slowing
down; personification of autumn as a reaper or
a harvester
“sound asleep,” “Drows'd ” пѓ Autumn is
listless and even falls asleep
“Thou watchest the last oozings hours by
hours ”: The end of the cycle is near. The
squeezing of the apple cider is nearly finished
(“the last oozings”)
Stanza 3
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Autumn: Description of the beauty of autumn. Keats blends living and
dying, the pleasant and the unpleasant, because they are crucial elements of
the mixed nature.
Mention of “spring”: 1. representing process; the proceeding flow of time
(like the “summer” in stanza 1) 2. Spring is a time of rebirth of life which
contrasts with the seemingly dying autumn of stanza 3.
“the soft-dying day”: Its dying also creates beauty (as the following lines
present)
“While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day, And touch the stubbleplains with rosy hue ”: the setting sun casts a “bloom” of “rosy hue” over the
stubble left after the harvest
“And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn”: sheep will be
slaughtered in autumn (Note: why is Keats using the term “lambs” rather
than “sheep”?)
“And gathering swallows twitter in the skies”: The swallows are gathering
for their winter migration пѓ suggesting that the autumn will cease
пЃ®
We could compare To Autumn with ж­ђй™Ѕ
修 ’s “秋聲賦,” which describes autumn as a
withering season rather than a season of
harvest and beauty. But it also has some
similarities with To Autumn as in “商,傷也;
物既老而悲傷。夷,戮也;物過盛而當
殺。 ” which correlate with stanza 3 (ex:
“And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly
bourn ”)
Images
пЃ®
Keats wrote a letter to his friend
J. H. Reynolds after he wrote
"To Autumn."
пЃ®
Even the letter alludes to
ancient myths, where Diana (in
Roman myth, or Artemis in
Greek) is the moon and the
goddess of chastity and hunting.
Letter to J. H. Reynolds
пЃ®
“How beautiful the season is now -- How fine the
air. A temperate sharpness about it. Really,
without joking, chaste weather -- Dian skies -- I
never lik'd stubble-fields so much as now -- Aye
better than the chilly green of the Spring.
Somehow a stubble plain looks warm -- in the same
way that some pictures look warm -- This struck
me so much in my Sunday's walk that I composed
upon it. “
Images
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Keats did not believe in gods and goddesses. He did, however, take a
great interest in the poetry of ancient Greece, and "To Autumn" is the
sixth in his famous sequence of odes, poems ancient Greeks wrote to
the various gods in their polytheistic world. To the Greeks, a god was
not a distant, disembodied entity. Thus a god could dwell at the site of
a river, for it was the spirit of the river. Even one of the mightiest gods,
Apollo, was at some level simply the sun.
In "To Autumn," Keats treats autumn as a kind of god or goddess
whose presence can be felt in many occurrences of late summer and
early fall.
“The weather, crops, plants and animals, sounds, even the activities
typical of that season” are turned into images of the god's presence.
Images:Stanza 1
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
The whole stanza is a single phrase that does
not form a complete sentence.
It addresses Autumn by name, just as a prayer
would begin by invoking or naming the god it
addresses, but uses a description rather than
Autumn's proper name.( e.g. “Season of mists
and mellow fruitfulness,”&“Close bosom-friend
of the maturing sun”)
Personification
Images:Stanza 1
Besides maturing sun,
other words and
phrases that suggest
maturity
пѓ And fill all fruit with
ripeness to the core;
пѓ To swell the gourd, and
plump the hazel shells
пЃ®
Images:Stanza 1
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
A repetitive listing of ripening indicates that Keats might
designed it on purpose, in order to show the conspiracy
between autumn and sun.
Autumn and the sun not only load but also bless the
vines with fruit. пѓ the effects of using the word bless
at the end of the stanza, Autumn and the sun make so
many flowers bud late in the season that the bees have
become confused (Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.) пѓ suggests
unawareness
Images:Stanza 2
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
“Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy
store?вЂќпѓ Keats is stressing that in fact
everyone has seen Autumn.
“harvested grain, a partially harvested field,
apples being pressed to make cider” пѓ All
the stanza's images take sights common in the
countryside during autumn
“sitting careless; sound asleep; Drows'd; keep
/ Steady; with patient lookвЂќпѓ the images
seem to picture Autumn at rest
Images:Stanza 3
пЃ®
пѓ пѓ вЂњthe soft-dying day,”“mourn,” “sinking,” “dies,”
words and phrases that suggest death or dying
Indicates that “Autumn is leaving”
Images:Stanza 3
пЃ®
Autumn's music: “Then
in a wailful
choir the small gnats mourn”
“And full-grown lambs loud bleat
from hilly bourn;” “Hedgecrickets sing; and now with
treble soft” “The red-breast
whistles from a garden-croft”
“And gathering swallows twitter
in the skies”
Images:Stanza 3
пЃ®
“And full-grown lambs bleat from hilly bourne;”
“Hedge-crickets sing;”
“And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.”
пѓ connotations of death
“Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breat whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies."
Implication of “Autumn”
in John Keats’ Romantic
poem
Alfonso Liu
пЃ®
пЃ®
Autumn with
fruitfulness, abundance,
and joyfulness
Autumn with
hope (sun)
1st stanza—describing the
autumn as a fruitful season
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the mossed cottage trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimmed their clammy cells.
2nd stanza—Comparing autumn to
“someone” (personification)
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twinГ©d flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cyder-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.
3rd stanza—Autumn is a symbol
of maturity of beings
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,—
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.
Winchester College
Comparison &
Conclusion
Elaine
Personal Questions
1.
2.
3.
4.
Which poem do you find easier to read?
Which one do you like more?
Which topic interests you more: Art or
Nature? How are they different?
Do you get emotionally involved in the
things you like? Do you get emotionally
involved in Art and/or Nature?
Do you agree that truth and beauty are all
you need to know?
Reflective Questions
1.
пЃ®
пЃ®
How do the two different openings present
the two speakers’ different attitudes and
moods?
Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness,
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, /
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Reflective Questions
1.
2.
3.
How does each speaker talk to/about the
subject (Art/Nature)?
What are their attitudes?
Is the speaker in “To Autumn” more
respectful and in awe than “Grecian Urn”?
How?
Reflective Questions
1.
2.
3.
Who drives the story and the action in each
poem?
Are reality and imagination given the same
weights/values in both poems?
Are the speakers’ questions resolved in the
poems? If not, what are the effects of these
unanswered questions?
Odes
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Lengthy
Serious in subject matter
Elevated in its word choice and style
Elaborate structure in stanzas
The Horatian ode - “To Autumn”
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
uniform stanzas
same metrical pattern
more personal, meditative, & restrained
Structure
Grecian Urn
To Autumn
--> The timelessness of the urn
--> Ripeness of the harvest
--> Ideal v.s. Real (canst not
--> Laziness of the Autumn
leave… nor ever can… never, --> Imageries of death and
never…)
passing.
--> Greater passions depicted
on the urn
--> Looks at the urn from
without; imaginations
--> Addresses the urn and
speaks to it as an observer
--> Conclusion: beauty v.s. truth
Tone
Grecian Urn
пЃ® Apostrophe - direct
address (18)
пЃ® Many questions
пЃ® Theoretical questions
and statements
What mad pursuit? What
struggle to escape?
�Beauty is truth, truth
beauty’
To Autumn
пЃ® Apostrophe - aids in
the imagery (8)
пЃ® More descriptions,
less questions
пЃ® Retrospective, calm,
reflective, unhurried
Thee sitting careless on a
granary floor, / Thy
hair soft-lifted by the
winnowing wind;
Perspective
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
Grecian Urn
Narrator is emotionally
involved in the narration
There is a constant question on
art and life, reality and
imagination
Speaks to the urn and asks for a
response
Bold Lover, never, never
canst thou kiss
Though winning near the
goal -- yet, do not
grieve;
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
пЃ®
To Autumn
Narrator is less emotionally
involved, but is very observant
Does not flee from the reality
Appreciates Nature as it is
Narrator contemplates a lot (speaks
to himself)
Where are the songs of
Spring? Ay, where are they?
and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from
a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows
twitter in the skies.
Concluding Questions
1.
2.
3.
Are the speakers’ questions resolved in the poems?
If not, what are the effects of these unanswered
questions?
How do the speakers approach the complexities and
mysteries of life, art, and nature?
Do art and nature really offer us more than our
perception of reality? Or are we the ones defining
the meaning of art and nature?
Sources
пЃ®
пЃ®
Newman Library
http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/digital/2000/c_n_c/c_07_roma
nticism/reading_keats.htm
Brooklyn College
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/autumn.
html
Документ
Категория
Презентации
Просмотров
19
Размер файла
774 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа